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State of Virginia looking to REQUIRE OPEN CAPTION showings during peak times

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  • State of Virginia looking to REQUIRE OPEN CAPTION showings during peak times

    https://legiscan.com/VA/bill/SB274/2020?fbclid=IwAR2D-CJ0P2QWImHSpN8Ywz6ylUhcs5hZSflkU-Pt81Qe4Rj51pEU3HkmjlM

    Status

    Spectrum: Partisan Bill (Democrat 1-0)
    Status: Introduced on January 3 2020 - 25% progression
    Action: 2020-01-09 - Rereferred to Commerce and Labor
    Pending: Senate Commerce and Labor Committee
    Text: Latest bill text (Prefiled) [HTML] Summary

    Motion picture theaters; required open-captioned showings. Requires any motion picture theater that has four or more separate auditoriums to provide two scheduled showings of a motion picture that engages open captions for a particular showing of an open-captioned-available motion picture each week in any auditorium showing any open-captioned-available motion picture. The measure requires one showing in each auditorium to be during peak weekend motion picture attendance hours, and at least half of the other open-captioned showings to be during peak weekday motion picture attendance hours. If any auditorium is showing more than one motion picture during a week, the theater may select the motion picture to offer as open-captioned showings, but shall show a different motion picture on the weekend than it shows during the week. The measure prohibits a theater from providing more than one open-captioned showing at overlapping times unless the theater has more auditoriums than available showtimes. Persons suffering loss or injury resulting from a violation may bring an action to recover damages and reasonable attorney fees or injunctive relief.


    This is a bad trend, in my opinion and I hope it gets quashed. Many theatres already offer open-caption screenings (they are MUCH preferred for those that need captions instead of the closed caption devices). However, this proposed law goes much further and dictates that part of the peak hours has to be given up to open-caption showings. Open captions are a distraction to most and take a way from the suspension of disbelief. It will be yet one more reason people will opt out of going to the cinema to see a movie, particularly on date-night. At home, there won't be any such mandate!

    This is something I think is best left up to the business to determine what benefits their business and patrons. I would have less of a problem of requiring open-captions at least 1 matinee (if you run them) and 1 evening, per week but to require that a theatre give up a prime slot to cater to a significant minority of patrons goes beyond reasonable accommodation. Those theatres located near communities/schools that have disabled people that benefit from Open-Captions will go out of their way to accommodate such individuals because that make good business sense, if not good human sense. However this is painting a law with a way too large a brush.

  • #2
    More reasons not to go to movies grrrrr

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    • #3
      This is difficult to justify when I look at the turnout we have for open caption/sensory sensitive shows, and the number of times per week our closed captioned units are checked out. Although we have not made a practice of running open caption shows, we have not had any measurable requests for open caption showings. At best we receive a couple requests per year.

      Seems like a better approach to this would be to find a couple large theatres willing to offer OC screenings on a regular basis and track the attendance for these showings over time. One trend I speculate could emerge is senior citizens might migrate to these showings over time.
      Last edited by Justin Hamaker; 01-10-2020, 03:47 PM.

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      • #4
        I'm writing this from a country, where we're used to subtitles on screen... most of the time. To be honest, when I'm watching a movie with close friends, we usually turn them off as they do annoy me to some small extent. Obviously, when you're watching a movie in a language you don't muster, they're pretty much a requirement.

        Requiring open captions for hearing impaired during "peak times" feels indeed like overreaching to such extent that it will hurt the common business of said business. It's not like your average exhibition business is such a gold mine, so you can allow for such experiments to impact your main business. This alone should carry some weight.

        Furthermore, I can't really speak for the "HI community", but I can believe that most hearing impaired persons would probably favor a show that's primarily shared with other hearing impaired persons.
        Last edited by Marcel Birgelen; 01-10-2020, 11:32 PM. Reason: Changed language from Dunglish to English.

        Comment


        • #5
          Persons suffering loss or injury resulting from a violation may bring an action to recover damages and reasonable attorney fees or injunctive relief.
          This statement alone shows that is is unreasonable and oversteps the boundaries of basic rights, in this case the freedom to run a PRIVATE business in a manner as the owner sees fit.

          So if someone who is HI can't make the scheduled OC screenings, they would now have the right to sue for "loss or injury" (give me a f'in break) just because they didn't get to see the OC showing? Please explain to me how not being able to see a freakin MOVIE would result in a LOSS or INJURY?!?

          Justin's proposal is reasonable and would avoid the need for this stupid legislation. (And the theatres who do it could see a monetary boost as well.)

          Every theatre in Virginia needs to step up and notify their "elected officials" that they will file suit if this bill passes.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tony Bandiera Jr View Post

            This statement alone shows that is is unreasonable and oversteps the boundaries of basic rights, in this case the freedom to run a PRIVATE business in a manner as the owner sees fit.

            So if someone who is HI can't make the scheduled OC screenings, they would now have the right to sue for "loss or injury" (give me a f'in break) just because they didn't get to see the OC showing? Please explain to me how not being able to see a freakin MOVIE would result in a LOSS or INJURY?!?

            Justin's proposal is reasonable and would avoid the need for this stupid legislation. (And the theatres who do it could see a monetary boost as well.)

            Every theatre in Virginia needs to step up and notify their "elected officials" that they will file suit if this bill passes.

            Agree. This proposed law is insane and goes beyond totalitarian dictatorship type of government. A movie is not designed to be experienced with open captioning as the "base" presentation. Technology has allowed a way for HI people to experience movies with both open and closed captioning. Requiring that a business do something that hurts their business with non-HI customers is very wrong.

            This type of proposal is ADA taken way too far. A ramp for a person in a wheelchair helps them have access and doesn't negatively effect anybody else. There is a huge difference between making sure everybody has physical access to all businesses and making sure all people can experience a business in the way that is most perfect for them. What's next, restaurants required to offer pureed forms of all their dishes that are able to be put into an NG tube?

            Comment


            • #7
              I full stop wouldn't go to a film with closed captions, unless of course it was a non-English film with English captions.

              I wonder if something clever could be done with polarisation - have the film polarised one way, and the captions polarised another. Then when viewed normally it will show them, but put on polarised glasses, and the captions would be removed. Of course, this would require everyone but the people wanting the captions to wear special glasses, but I'd prefer that than being required to see the captions.

              Comment


              • #8
                ...yeah, and that pesky silver screen that ruins the picture for everyone too.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by David Ferguson View Post
                  I full stop wouldn't go to a film with closed captions, unless of course it was a non-English film with English captions.

                  I wonder if something clever could be done with polarisation - have the film polarised one way, and the captions polarised another. Then when viewed normally it will show them, but put on polarised glasses, and the captions would be removed. Of course, this would require everyone but the people wanting the captions to wear special glasses, but I'd prefer that than being required to see the captions.
                  You have it backwards..why force the people who DON'T want to see the captions into wearing the glasses?

                  If it were the other way 'round, where those who need the captions wear glasses, it could be a viable idea, other than forcing theatres to install special equipment, the silver screen, and maintain glasses....

                  Lyle said it best...

                  Agree. This proposed law is insane and goes beyond totalitarian dictatorship type of government. A movie is not designed to be experienced with open captioning as the "base" presentation. Technology has allowed a way for HI people to experience movies with both open and closed captioning. Requiring that a business do something that hurts their business with non-HI customers is very wrong.

                  This type of proposal is ADA taken way too far. A ramp for a person in a wheelchair helps them have access and doesn't negatively effect anybody else. There is a huge difference between making sure everybody has physical access to all businesses and making sure all people can experience a business in the way that is most perfect for them. What's next, restaurants required to offer pureed forms of all their dishes that are able to be put into an NG tube?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Steve Guttag View Post
                    ...yeah, and that pesky silver screen that ruins the picture for everyone too.
                    Besides the requirement for glasses, a screen that works with the system, extra light output, etc. What is one of the hardest things to avoid cross-talk on between left and right?

                    Subtitles.

                    Even with shutter-glasses there is still some cross talk as the shutter isn't 100% effective. With no subtitles on the A frames and subtitles on the B frames, the ghosting will be pretty obvious, no matter what system you're using.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by David Ferguson View Post
                      I full stop wouldn't go to a film with closed captions,.
                      At the risk of being nit-picky- - I think you mean OPEN captions.

                      OPEN captions can be seen by everyone. CLOSED captions require the viewer to wear
                      glasses or use some sort of accessory device to be seen.

                      A lot of people get these confused.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jim Cassedy View Post
                        At the risk of being nit-picky- - I think you mean OPEN captions.
                        Oops yes - I did of course mean open captions. I'm just so used to talking about closed captions, that I wrote that instead!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not to get into the political arena, but if you are familiar with which party dominates the Virginia legislature now you'd understand why insane bills like this even make it to committee.

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