Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

35 and 70 mm licorice pizza

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 35 and 70 mm licorice pizza

    It's a good possibility that I'm getting a 35 or 70 mm of this film at Willow Creek in Plymouth Minnesota, anybody else out there , heard they're getting it. I see on the 70 mm rumor Mill that a theater in New York is getting it in 70 there's got to be a lot less theaters now that have the capability with Pacific ArcLight shut down, and from what I heard the film copies open at the end of November and you're going to have just about a 30-day exclusive ,before it goes wide at Christmas

  • #2
    The AFI/Silver is having me come in to give their 70mm machines the once-over as they consider it a possibility for them in November too.

    Wasn't it shot in 35mm Scope? 4K DI so 70mm is probably not going to be a shining example. Also, based on the trailer, I suspect that the cinematography isn't such that 70mm is going to be a major benefit. But, who knows?
    Last edited by Steve Guttag; 10-10-2021, 09:48 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      It was shot in 35mm scope. If the 70mm blowup will come from the 4K intermediate, then... meh... simply a waste of 70mm film.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by David J Hilsgen View Post
        I see on the 70 mm rumor Mill that a theater in New York is getting it in 70
        The Angelica Village East was saying that they were getting it in 70mm, but they are backing away from that now. It’s just as well, it’s a terrible venue for 70mm. The projection down angle is so steep that they wind up trying to mask off the keystoning, cutting off a significant portion of the sides.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Marcel Birgelen View Post
          It was shot in 35mm scope. If the 70mm blowup will come from the 4K intermediate, then... meh... simply a waste of 70mm film.
          There will be a benefit for light levels on very big screens. a 4K DI printed on 70mm will look better than the vast majority of digital projection setups so not a complete waste of 70mm film.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's also not a waste if it keeps 70mm projectors in theatres, 70mm processing lines in labs open, and knowledgable people employed to operate them. From the synopsis Licorice Pizza doesn't look like the kind of film I'm too interested in, but if it can help keep 70mm alive then I'm all for it!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Lyle Romer View Post

              There will be a benefit for light levels on very big screens. a 4K DI printed on 70mm will look better than the vast majority of digital projection setups so not a complete waste of 70mm film.
              How many film prints will there be struck? A handful? There are more 4K nP laser setups (like the Dolby Cinema ones) out there that will have no problems with sufficient light levels on very big screens.

              Originally posted by David Ferguson View Post
              It's also not a waste if it keeps 70mm projectors in theatres, 70mm processing lines in labs open, and knowledgable people employed to operate them. From the synopsis Licorice Pizza doesn't look like the kind of film I'm too interested in, but if it can help keep 70mm alive then I'm all for it!
              With that kind of reasoning, we should just start to push random digitally produced junk out to 70mm, because "it will keep lines open", even if the end-product isn't any better. It reminds me of the trend to push digitally produced records out to vinyl...

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's another problem: not every recent movie output on 70mm prints has had those prints consistently booked onto the largest screen in a given location. PT Anderson movies are generally regarded as "art house" fare. The theater in Oklahoma City where I watched "The Hateful Eight" in 70mm had the projection system installed in a mid-size auditorium, and the room had a common width screen featuring vertical masking. Getting movies in 70mm onto giant screens seems to be something exclusive to Christopher Nolan movies these days.

                Comment

                Working...
                X