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» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » Film-Yak   » The Oscars 2018: Results from the 90th Academy Awards (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: The Oscars 2018: Results from the 90th Academy Awards
Marcel Birgelen
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From: Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands
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 - posted 03-05-2018 02:11 AM      Profile for Marcel Birgelen   Email Marcel Birgelen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Winners are listed first and in bold.

Best picture
  • The Shape of Water – Guillermo del Toro and J. Miles Dale
  • Call Me by Your Name – Peter Spears, Luca Guadagnino, Emilie Georges, and Marco Morabito
  • Darkest Hour – Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten, and Douglas Urbanski
  • Dunkirk – Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan
  • Get Out – Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Edward H. Hamm Jr., and Jordan Peele
  • Lady Bird – Scott Rudin, Eli Bush, and Evelyn O'Neill
  • Phantom Thread – JoAnne Sellar, Paul Thomas Anderson, Megan Ellison and Daniel Lupi
  • The Post – Amy Pascal, Steven Spielberg, and Kristie Macosko Krieger
  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, and Martin McDonagh
Best Director
  • Guillermo del Toro – The Shape of Water
  • Christopher Nolan – Dunkirk
  • Jordan Peele – Get Out
  • Greta Gerwig – Lady Bird
  • Paul Thomas Anderson – Phantom Thread
Best Actor
  • Gary Oldman – Darkest Hour as Winston Churchill
  • Timothée Chalamet – Call Me by Your Name as Elio Perlman
  • Daniel Day-Lewis – Phantom Thread as Reynolds Woodcock
  • Daniel Kaluuya – Get Out as Chris Washington
  • Denzel Washington – Roman J. Israel, Esq. as Roman J. Israel
Best Actress
  • Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri as Mildred Hayes
  • Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water as Elisa Esposit
  • Margot Robbie – I, Tonya as Tonya Harding
  • Saoirse Ronan – Lady Bird as Christine "Lady Bird" McPherson
  • Meryl Streep – The Post as Katharine Graham
Best Supporting Actor
  • Sam Rockwell – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri as Officer Jason Dixon
  • Willem Dafoe – The Florida Project as Bobby Hicks
  • Woody Harrelson – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri as Chief Bill Willoughby
  • Richard Jenkins – The Shape of Water as Giles
  • Christopher Plummer – All the Money in the World as J. Paul Getty
Best Supporting Actress
  • Allison Janney – I, Tonya as LaVona Golden
  • Mary J. Blige – Mudbound as Florence Jackson
  • Lesley Manville – Phantom Thread as Cyril Woodcock
  • Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird as Marion McPherson
  • Octavia Spencer – The Shape of Water as Zelda Delilah Fuller
Best Original Screenplay
  • Get Out – Written by Jordan Peele
  • The Big Sick – Written by Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani
  • Lady Bird – Written by Greta Gerwig
  • The Shape of Water – Screenplay by Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor; Story by Guillermo del Toro
  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Written by Martin McDonagh
Best Adapted Screenplay
  • Call Me by Your Name – James Ivory based on the novel by André Aciman
  • The Disaster Artist – Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber based on the book by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell
  • Logan – Screenplay by Scott Frank, James Mangold and Michael Green; Story by James Mangold based on characters from the X-Men comic books and theatrical motion pictures
  • Molly's Game – Aaron Sorkin based on the memoir by Molly Bloom
  • Mudbound – Virgil Williams and Dee Rees based on the novel by Hillary Jordan
Best Animated Feature Film
  • Coco – Lee Unkrich and Darla K. Anderson
  • The Boss Baby – Tom McGrath and Ramsey Ann Naito
  • The Breadwinner – Nora Twomey and Anthony Leo
  • Ferdinand – Carlos Saldanha
  • Loving Vincent – Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman and Ivan Mactaggart
Best Foreign Language Film
  • A Fantastic Woman (Chile) in Spanish – Directed by Sebastián Lelio
  • The Insult (Lebanon) in Arabic – Directed by Ziad Doueiri
  • Loveless (Russia) in Russian – Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev
  • On Body and Soul (Hungary) in Hungarian – Directed by Ildikó Enyedi
  • The Square (Sweden) in Swedish – Directed by Ruben Östlund
Best Documentary Feature
  • Icarus – Bryan Fogel and Dan Cogan
  • Abacus: Small Enough to Jail – Steve James, Mark Mitten and Julie Goldman
  • Faces Places – Agnès Varda, JR and Rosalie Varda
  • Last Men in Aleppo – Feras Fayyad, Kareem Abeed and Søren Steen Jespersen
  • Strong Island – Yance Ford and Joslyn Barnes
Best Documentary – Short Subject
  • Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405 – Frank Stiefel
  • Edith+Eddie – Laura Checkoway and Thomas Lee Wright
  • Heroin(e) – Elaine McMillion Sheldon and Kerrin Sheldon
  • Knife Skills – Thomas Lennon
  • Traffic Stop – Kate Davis and David Heilbroner
Best Live Action Short Film
  • The Silent Child – Chris Overton and Rachel Shenton
  • DeKalb Elementary – Reed Van Dyk
  • The Eleven O'Clock – Derin Seale and Josh Lawson
  • My Nephew Emmett – Kevin Wilson Jr.
  • Watu Wote/All of Us – Katja Benrath and Tobias Rosen
Best Animated Short Film
  • Dear Basketball – Glen Keane and Kobe Bryant
  • Garden Party – Victor Caire and Gabriel Grapperon
  • Lou – Dave Mullins and Dana Murray
  • Negative Space – Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata
  • Revolting Rhymes – Jakob Schuh and Jan Lachauer
Best Original Score
  • The Shape of Water – Alexandre Desplat
  • Dunkirk – Hans Zimmer
  • Phantom Thread – Jonny Greenwood
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi – John Williams
  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Carter Burwell
Best Original Song
  • "Remember Me" from Coco – Music and Lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
  • "Mighty River" from Mudbound – Music and Lyrics by Mary J. Blige, Raphael Saadiq and Taura Stinson
  • "Mystery of Love" from Call Me by Your Name – Music and Lyrics by Sufjan Stevens
  • "Stand Up for Something" from Marshall – Music by Diane Warren; Lyrics by Common and Diane Warren
  • "This Is Me" from The Greatest Showman – Music and Lyrics by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul
Best Sound Editing
  • Dunkirk – Richard King and Alex Gibson
  • Baby Driver – Julian Slater
  • Blade Runner 2049 – Mark Mangini and Theo Green
  • The Shape of Water – Nathan Robitaille and Nelson Ferreira
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Matthew Wood and Ren Klyce
Best Sound Mixing
  • Dunkirk – Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker and Gary A. Rizzo
  • Baby Driver – Julian Slater, Tim Cavagin and Mary H. Ellis
  • Blade Runner 2049 – Ron Bartlett, Doug Hemphill and Mac Ruth
  • The Shape of Water – Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern and Glen Gauthier
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi – David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Stuart Wilson
Best Production Design
  • The Shape of Water – Production Design: Paul Denham Austerberry; Set Decoration: Shane Vieau and Jeff Melvin
  • Beauty and the Beast – Production Design: Sarah Greenwood; Set Decoration: Katie Spencer
  • Blade Runner 2049 – Production Design: Dennis Gassner; Set Decoration: Alessandra Querzola
  • Darkest Hour – Production Design: Sarah Greenwood; Set Decoration: Katie Spencer
  • Dunkirk – Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Gary Fettis
Best Cinematography
  • Blade Runner 2049 – Roger A. Deakins
  • Darkest Hour – Bruno Delbonnel
  • Dunkirk – Hoyte van Hoytema
  • Mudbound – Rachel Morrison
  • The Shape of Water – Dan Laustsen
Best Makeup and Hairstyling
  • Darkest Hour – Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski and Lucy Sibbick
  • Victoria & Abdul – Daniel Phillips and Lou Sheppard
  • Wonder – Arjen Tuiten
Best Costume Design
  • Phantom Thread – Mark Bridges
  • Beauty and the Beast – Jacqueline Durran
  • Darkest Hour – Jacqueline Durran
  • The Shape of Water – Luis Sequeira
  • Victoria & Abdul – Consolata Boyle
Best Film Editing
  • Dunkirk – Lee Smith
  • Baby Driver – Paul Machliss and Jonathan Amos
  • I, Tonya – Tatiana S. Riegel
  • The Shape of Water – Sidney Wolinsky
  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Jon Gregory
Best Visual Effects
  • Blade Runner 2049 – John Nelson, Gerd Nefzer, Paul Lambert and Richard R. Hoover
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 – Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Jonathan Fawkner and Dan Sudick
  • Kong: Skull Island – Stephen Rosenbaum, Jeff White, Scott Benza and Mike Meinardus
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Ben Morris, Mike Mulholland, Neal Scanlan and Chris Corbould
  • War for the Planet of the Apes – Joe Letteri, Daniel Barrett, Dan Lemmon and Joel Whist

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Leo Enticknap
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From: Loma Linda, CA
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 - posted 03-05-2018 07:43 AM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"Heaven is a traffic jam on the 405" ???!!! If you ever wanted proof that they've just legalized pot in this place...

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Carsten Kurz
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 - posted 03-05-2018 08:39 AM      Profile for Carsten Kurz   Email Carsten Kurz   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
100% okay with these. Good to see Deakins finally being awarded.

Sam Rockwell was a must as well. He was even more impressing in Three Billboards than Frances McDormand. He deserves the award for his body language alone.

- Carsten

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Martin McCaffery
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 - posted 03-05-2018 08:59 AM      Profile for Martin McCaffery   Author's Homepage   Email Martin McCaffery   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
First Oscars I've watched in about 5 years. So, for the 90th year in a row, worst Oscars ever.

Was Deakins coked out of his mind, or is he always twitchy and scratchy?

Sally Hawkins (big fan) looked seriously ill. It's usually a big competition to decide who is the most dangerously underweight woman at the Oscars. No contest this year. Get that woman a cheeseburger.

Best Acceptance Speech: Allison Janney. If only she had stopped after the first sentence (and she would have won the jet ski).

The Best of the Dead was severely lacking in star power this year. We need a higher quality of deaths for next year.

Worst Dressed: Armie Hammer and his maroon velvet tux. Runner up, the sound editor who I guess thought he was being rebellious, but just looked like a clown.

Worst Make Up: J-Law. Looked she hired a Cher Stylist wannabe.

I guess some movies got awards, too. But who cares? [Wink]

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Carsten Kurz
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 - posted 03-05-2018 09:37 AM      Profile for Carsten Kurz   Email Carsten Kurz   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yup. Awards well deserved, but the entertainment factor of the show was pretty low.

The live music/singer performances also appeared pretty amateurish to me. I have no problem with an 'unplugged' approach as such, but not at the OSCARs.

That said, not everyone in that business needs to be a brilliant entertainer, so, scratching Deakins appeared quite personable to me.
But, hosts and presenters should offer a bit more bang for the buck.

- Carsten

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Mike Blakesley
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 - posted 03-05-2018 01:36 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I watched Frances McDormand's acceptance speech online. I thought she was having a nervous breakdown at some point.

I enjoyed the Best Picture presentation segment.

From the clips they showed, the Best Picture winner looked like a positively horrible movie, but what do I know? It must be decent at least.

I was glad to see Coco get best animated film, really no contest this year on that one. I don't know if any of you get the Hollywood Reporter, but I do and I was amazed to see the number of giant promotional ads that were placed pushing The Boss Baby. Seriously? Even Ferdinand was better.

Best Song was a closer race for me, I thought the tune from The Greatest Showman was really good but the Coco tune was great as well.

Bottom line, this is probably the Oscars I cared least about in my exhibition career just because we hardly played any of the movies. We played only 2 of the Best Picture nominees.

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Bobby Henderson
"Ask me about Trajan."

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 - posted 03-05-2018 01:43 PM      Profile for Bobby Henderson   Email Bobby Henderson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Once again, there were no surprise winners at all in any of the major categories. All of the winners were telegraphed by previous awards presenstations from the Screen Actors Guild, Directors Guild, Producers Guild and Writers Guild.

I was happy for Jordan Peele winning the Best Original Screenplay Oscar. I really liked the Key & Peele show despite the griping from Dave Chappelle. Hard to belive Peele is the first African American to win a screenwriting Oscar. I thought maybe someone like Spike Lee had done that previously (Dead Poets Society won that Oscar the year Do the Right Thing was nominated).

Another unique piece of trivia: I'm pretty sure Kobe Bryant is the first person to win both an Oscar and NBA championship trophy. Are there any other professional athletes who have won championships in an organized sport and also won an Oscar?

Francis McDormand's "inclusion rider" thing seems really out of touch with how and WHERE most "Hollywood" movies are being produced. High cost and regulatory requirements have pushed many productions out of California. States like New Mexico and Georgia have attracted many hundreds of movie and TV projects. Texas and Louisiana are popular sites for production. And then there's all the stuff going on outside of the United States. Vancover, Toronto and other parts of Canada have been grabbing up "American" movie and TV productions for a long time. Even New Zealand and Australia are doing the same. A bunch of this stuff is about controlling cost, diversity and inclusion be damned. Increasing amounts of post production work, such as animation and CGI work, is getting farmed out to the Far East and India.

I was a little disappointed Dunkirk didn't win the Best Cinematography Oscar. The movie didn't have the greatest ever looking 70mm & IMAX 70mm footage. Still it was a pretty tremendous effort to shoot that kind of a movie on 65mm film, with most of it being true IMAX. The Oscar winner, Bladerunner: 2049 was a great looking movie; however, much of its look was generated in the computer not on set and in the camera. With the amount of CGI, digital back lot compositing, color grading, etc going on with movies like Bladerunner: 2049 they almost qualify to be lumped into the Best Animated Movie category. These movies are only a few steps short of being cartoons. Dunkirk was a very "analog" movie by comparison.

It's a long running Oscar tradition to have movies up for the top awards get their haul of nominations inflated by gimmies in the technical categories. Dunkirk seemed to be a worthy winner of the Best Film Editing Oscar. I think Baby Driver was worthy of the award as well. The other 3 nominees in that category were just along for the ride. Other more action oriented or experimental movies might have been more worthy of inclusion there.

quote: Martin McCaffery
Was Deakins coked out of his mind, or is he always twitchy and scratchy?
I was thinking it might be imaginary "meth bugs."

quote: Mike Blakesley
From the clips they showed, the Best Picture winner looked like a positively horrible, but what do I know? It must be decent at least.
I think viewers need to actually watch The Shape of Water and give it a chance before passing judgment on it. I thought it was a really good movie. It has a truly despicable villain. Parts of the movie will make viewers uncomfortable and squeamish. But it all ends up making perfect sense in the end. Performances from Sally Hawkins, Michael Shannon, Michael Stuhlbarg and several others were great. This was a very different movie in a tide of so much same-ness.

The Three Billboards movie might have won the top prize if not for some controversy surrounding it. I haven't been able to watch the movie yet for myself. It played here in Lawton a very short time and we missed it.

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Terry Monohan
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I ways hoping when many Dunkirk award winners were giving their little thanks you's at the Oscar show that they would mention It was shot on rare 70mm film, a classic format from the mid 50's that makes the movie crisp and stand out. The public has no idea what 70mm is these days as no one even plugs It, not even the guys that filmed It when they won a award for Dunkirk in front of millions of people around the world.

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Marcel Birgelen
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 - posted 03-05-2018 04:31 PM      Profile for Marcel Birgelen   Email Marcel Birgelen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Bobby Henderson
I was a little disappointed Dunkirk didn't win the Best Cinematography Oscar. The movie didn't have the greatest ever looking 70mm & IMAX 70mm footage. Still it was a pretty tremendous effort to shoot that kind of a movie on 65mm film, with most of it being true IMAX. The Oscar winner, Bladerunner: 2049 was a great looking movie; however, much of its look was generated in the computer not on set and in the camera. With the amount of CGI, digital back lot compositing, color grading, etc going on with movies like Bladerunner: 2049 they almost qualify to be lumped into the Best Animated Movie category. These movies are only a few steps short of being cartoons. Dunkirk was a very "analog" movie by comparison.
Cinematography and Special Effects have always been very close to each other. The problem with stuff like the Academy Awards is that there are just vague guidelines on what to vote. In case of cinematography, what's more important? The process of getting there or the actual end result?

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Bobby Henderson
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 - posted 03-05-2018 07:53 PM      Profile for Bobby Henderson   Email Bobby Henderson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I was under the impression only cinematographers could vote in the cinematography Oscar category. One would think they would at least appreciate the effort that went into filming a war epic on 5/65mm and 15/65mm film. On the other hand there are cinematographers who are staunchly in favor of an all-digital approach. So maybe there's a clash of philosophy present. Inception is the only recent movie to make any use of 65mm cinematography and win the Best Cinematography Oscar.

FWIW, the American Society of Cinematographers gave its 2017 feature film award to Bladerunner: 2049. Yet another examples of the Oscars being telegraphed by other awards programs.

Long ago the Oscars divided the Cinematography awards into separate color and black & white categories. I'm not sure what they should do here. "Best Digital Intermediate" Oscar? Film use is dying off overall, so they wouldn't be able to sustain a separate "Film Cinematography" category. And then there's the issue of movies being shot on film, even 5/65mm in some cases, yet having all the posting work done via digital intermediate. With digital-based production so much of the movie's final look doesn't happen in the camera at all. They cover the basics on set then manipulate the living hell out of it with color grading, effects compositing and all sorts of other artificial sweeteners.

quote: Terry Monohan
I ways hoping when many Dunkirk award winners were giving their little thanks you's at the Oscar show that they would mention It was shot on rare 70mm film, a classic format from the mid 50's that makes the movie crisp and stand out. The public has no idea what 70mm is these days as no one even plugs It, not even the guys that filmed It when they won a award for Dunkirk in front of millions of people around the world.
Yeah, it's a shame. Even many people who have heard of 70mm don't really understand it. That's how you can have a movie shot on 65mm film, but processed in the digital realm during post and then output it to 70mm release prints as if no bottle-necking took place at all.

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Lionel Fouillen
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Nobody mentioned it, I'm so happy Gary Oldman got the Oscar for his performance in the Darkest Hour. Well deserved, and overall a great film.

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Mike Blakesley
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One thing I noticed that when they were running down the list of Best Pictures, the onscreen graphics shortened the title of the eventual winner to just "Shape of Water." I hate when that happens....it is "The Shape of Water." You would think the Academy would get things like that correct. I'm a real stickler for stuff like that on our marquee and such. I'll bet the filmmakers are the same way.

At least when the title was announced as the winner, they read all four words of the title properly.

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Carsten Kurz
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 - posted 03-06-2018 06:05 AM      Profile for Carsten Kurz   Email Carsten Kurz   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Mike, were you able to put 'Three Billboards' onto your marquee properly? Because we struggled ;-)

- Carsten

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Mark Ogden
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Winners and losers aside, the whole ceremony was so overtly political that it was hard to watch. I'm completely down with the Time's Up movement, but after all the bombast and shallow posturing they handed an Oscar to none other than Kobe Bryant, who was accused of raping a woman in a Colorado hotel room in 2003, he ran the "I thought it was consensual" defense and wound up apologizing and laying a ton of money on the gal. I guess everybody forgot, but for those who didn't it makes all the speeches and chest pounding a little laughable.

At least they remembered Haruo Nakajima on the memorial reel. It made the show for me.

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Richard P. May
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 - posted 03-06-2018 10:08 AM      Profile for Richard P. May   Email Richard P. May   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Bobby, re who votes for what: for nominations, each branch votes for their members, cinematographers for that, writers for screenplay, etc .
In the final voting, full membership votes for everything.
It gets a bit more complicated, but this is the general rule.

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