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» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » Film-Yak   » Phillips wants to completely destroy all quality in the cinema

   
Author Topic: Phillips wants to completely destroy all quality in the cinema
Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17662
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 08-30-2017 11:57 AM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
Not a joke. Read this nonsense

quote:

Philips Wants to Stop Piracy With 'Ambilight' Technology

By Ernesto on August 28, 2017

Over the years, many new technologies have tried to stop camcording piracy at movie theaters. From infrared beams, through night-vision goggles, to watermarks, thus far the problem still persists. Continuing the search for the ultimate anti-piracy tool, Philips now joins the quest with a proposal to use ambient lighting to mess with pirate recordings.

The movie industry sees illegally recorded movies as one of the biggest piracy threats and goes to extremes to stop it.

Over the years, movie theaters have used audio and video watermarking tools to detect pirates, for example. And during prominent events, night-vision goggles and other spy tech is used to monitor movie goers.

Most anti-piracy efforts are not particularly pleasing for the public, but a new technology from Philips hopes to change this. In a recent patent application the technology company proposes an ambient lighting system for movie theaters that will hinder pirate recordings.

“The major motion picture studios are losing large amounts of money due to piracy. The worldwide motion picture industry, distributors, theaters, video stores and pay-per-view operators, lose each year billions of dollars as a result of piracy,” the company begins.

Philips notes that many of the current security measures, such as watermarking, make piracy traceable. However, they don’t prevent actual recording and distribution. Watermarks can be simply rendered useless if pirates remove them afterwards, for example.

“The problem with current security measures in digital cinema is that they do not prevent pirates from filming the content from the cinema screen. Watermarks can help to identify the source of pirate content, but it does not prevent the actual copying and spreading of the content.”

The ambient lighting solution is different and Philips believes that it could reduce piracy substantially.

The concept is quite easy. By shining light on the visitors from the side, at a certain frequency, the pirate recordings will be severely degraded up to a point where they’ll become completely unwatchable.

“The solution proposed here is to shine visible light from an (additional) light source with a pre-determined modulation frequency at the cinema screen while the movie plays,” the patent application reads.

“When the frequency is chosen well, a camera will not be able to properly film the content, because the light source runs out of sync with the camera resulting in stripes running through the movie content.”

The idea is partly inspired by Philips existing Ambilight technology for TVs. This generates lighting effects around the TV that correspond to the video content. The cinema setup will do the same while hindering pirates in the process. A win-win situation, according to Philips.

“It is yet a further aspect to provide a more immersive experience when watching video content on a display device in combination with anti-piracy measures,” the patent application reads.

It’s unclear whether there are concrete plans to roll out the technology at movie theaters. Philips, however, is no stranger to these type of anti-piracy solutions. The company previously rolled out CineFence, a forensic marking technology for both image and sound, targeted at digital cinema content.

In any case, it’s a good marketing message to get movie theaters to try ambient lighting. Whether it’s really effective has yet to be seen though.

Yes let's just shine lights right at the screen. Genius!

And will someone please ban the use of the damn word "immersive" in this industry? Even just 3 paragraphs above in regards to Philips idea of shining light around the home tv screen...that is supposed to "provide a more immersive experience when watching video content on a display device".

BTW here is their stupid "Ambilight" tv demo. This is like watching a vertical video without black pillarbox bars, but a blurred version of the center of the image. The retardedness can be seen here.

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Carsten Kurz
Film God

Posts: 3681
From: Cologne, NRW, Germany
Registered: Aug 2009


 - posted 08-30-2017 03:52 PM      Profile for Carsten Kurz   Email Carsten Kurz   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
They are just trying to find another marketing point for their useless cinema ambilight system, which doesn't sell nearly as they expect. Call it despair. And their 'points' are simply made up to support their ambition. Won't happen.

- Carsten

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Bobby Henderson
"Ask me about Trajan."

Posts: 10677
From: Lawton, OK, USA
Registered: Apr 2001


 - posted 08-30-2017 04:04 PM      Profile for Bobby Henderson   Email Bobby Henderson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I would never pay to watch a movie in a theater that had lights beaming out of the side walls, affecting my peripheral vision and contaminating the screen image with extraneous light.

This stupid idea of a solution from Phillips would end up losing movie theaters and movie studios even more money from lost ticket sales than they would ever gain back from piracy prevention. Worse yet, this is yet another damned thing whose cost movie theater operators would have to absorb, as if the margins aren't narrow enough already.

This has been repeated many times previously: if the movie studios really want to put a big dent in piracy they need to stop distributing screener copies of the movies. If some actor or other "important" douche needs to see the movie in advance they can take their happy asses to a press/trade screening in a movie theater.

Little if anything can be done about people videotaping the movie theater screen with their phones. One idea is giving audience members an incentive to rat out would-be pirates. It pisses me off enough when some prick insists on texting or doing other shit with his phone during a movie. If someone was videotaping the movie from the screen I would probably inform management about it anyway. But getting a couple free passes or other goodies would certainly sweeten the deal.

I have absolutely no respect whatsoever for people who are willing to watch pirated movies that were taped from a theater screen. Why waste valuable time doing that? So many movies these days aren't worth watching even under great viewing conditions.

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Jesse Skeen
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1498
From: Sacramento, CA
Registered: Aug 2000


 - posted 08-30-2017 04:26 PM      Profile for Jesse Skeen   Email Jesse Skeen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I've sometimes poked around online for free movies to watch, but I've NEVER watched any shot in a theater with a camera. They just look and sound terrible even without any watermarking.

That "Crap Code" on 35mm prints the last few years they were out was a big contributor to me going to theaters less- did they catch even ONE pirate through that???

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Manny Montes
Master Film Handler

Posts: 270
From: United States
Registered: Feb 2010


 - posted 08-30-2017 05:03 PM      Profile for Manny Montes   Email Manny Montes   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Why does this have to be visible light? Wouldn't IR be just as effective and less distracting?

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David Stambaugh
Film God

Posts: 4016
From: Eugene, Oregon
Registered: Jan 2002


 - posted 08-30-2017 05:43 PM      Profile for David Stambaugh   Author's Homepage   Email David Stambaugh   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If it's in any way visible to the audience, or if it degrades image quality in any way, it's an automatic FAIL.

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Steve Moore
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 198
From: Leeds, West Yorks, UK
Registered: Apr 2008


 - posted 08-30-2017 05:56 PM      Profile for Steve Moore   Email Steve Moore   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Gosh, those TVs have never appealed to me and I'm sure would be distracting; however now I've seen that advert that Brad linked to the neodymium speakers on the optional stands have sold me; it sounds fancy! [Smile]

Rather than fitting the latest Philips DP75 with retrofit flashing extra lamps, why not just leave the auditorium cleaners lights on; in fact that would probably be less distracting!

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Carsten Kurz
Film God

Posts: 3681
From: Cologne, NRW, Germany
Registered: Aug 2009


 - posted 08-30-2017 06:17 PM      Profile for Carsten Kurz   Email Carsten Kurz   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Rather than fitting the latest Philips DP75 with retrofit flashing extra lamps, why not just leave the auditorium cleaners lights on;

Because Philips doesn't sell these.

- Carsten

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Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17662
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 08-30-2017 06:35 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
Actually...

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