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» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » Film-Yak   » Regal's Amy Miles thinks short windows might be okey-dokey... (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Regal's Amy Miles thinks short windows might be okey-dokey...
Mike Blakesley
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 - posted 03-07-2017 06:34 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Amy, if you'd look beyond your corporate doublespeak gobbledegook buzzword nonsense, you'd realize you're thinking about GRADUALLY TORPEDOING YOUR OWN BUSINESS!

Regal CEO Backs Shortened Theatrical Windowing by Major Studios

Regal Entertainment Group CEO Amy Miles on Monday talked up shortened theatrical windows that would see new movies released in homes sooner than within 90 days of a commercial release. But she warned against a premium VOD rollout that wasn't incremental for movie exhibitors and distributors alike.

"There's a lot of things that are very positive from a theatrical perspective, but no one, on our side or in distribution, wants to do anything that has uneconomic cannibalization," the exec told the Deutsche Bank Media & Telecom Conference during a session that was webcast.

Miles confirmed discussions continue between major studios and exhibitors about possibly offering movies in a premium VOD window soon after their cinema run. She added any deal to emerge from those talks cannot eat into the existing theatrical business.

"We both have very much aligned interests to make sure that ... changes happen in a manner where you try to find incremental revenues," Miles told investors. Streaming giant Netflix has changed the way movies get released, bringing them directly to consumer's homes without a theatrical release.

But she argued the theatrical experience is worth preserving, given 2015 and 2016 were record years for Hollywood box office, a feat likely to be repeated this year. "As long as we can find a solution that grows the overall pie, we think it could be good for the overall industry," said the exec.

Added Miles, "We need to be prudent and cautious and ensure as we have these conversations with direct partners, there's no unintended consequences from changed windows."

Hollywood Reporter

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Jay Glaus
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 - posted 03-07-2017 06:59 PM      Profile for Jay Glaus   Author's Homepage   Email Jay Glaus   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Let's see it is reported Ms Miles is compensated over 2 million a year plus stock options nearly equal that. A former executive at Price Watehouse. I am sure AMC CEO is compensated at least the same and he was in the hotel cruise industry. If you have any doubt how this is going to end a look at these two CEO's should give you a clue

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Jesse Skeen
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 - posted 03-09-2017 12:27 AM      Profile for Jesse Skeen   Email Jesse Skeen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Then studios should do short windows just long enough for her to lose her job! [evil]

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Monte L Fullmer
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 - posted 03-09-2017 05:48 PM      Profile for Monte L Fullmer   Email Monte L Fullmer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Lately, the majority of these releases are suddenly having their legs drop off by the third week and cinemas are taking that drop pretty bad.

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Manny Montes
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 - posted 03-09-2017 06:01 PM      Profile for Manny Montes   Email Manny Montes   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I disagree with shortening the window but agree with Monte that it seems like customers have shorter and shorter attention spans, even being in this industry for only 10 years I've seen the decline of how long we've held movies, now in the 3rd week of even a blockbuster hit i'm lucky to see 30 people for a 7pm showing of a movie in it's 3rd week, kids movies get hit especially hard with this drop off for some reason.

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Mike Blakesley
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 - posted 03-09-2017 06:17 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yeah, and what the studios don't recognize is, the drop is because:

a. the studios stop promoting the movie (having focused all their promotion $ on pushing the opening date)

b. people have the perception that the movie is "coming to video pretty soon"

So how will that change when the video date is even sooner than it is now?

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Dennis Benjamin
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 - posted 03-09-2017 07:03 PM      Profile for Dennis Benjamin   Author's Homepage   Email Dennis Benjamin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Amy Miles is not an experienced person in our Industry. She worked for an auditing company before working for REG (as mentioned above). I used to dial into the quarterly stock calls and realized the company was being run by "bean counters" and made my exit.

I had a lot of respect for Mike Campbell as he built the company from the ground up and was willing to "roll up his sleeves" and work his tail off to get results.

Since he left, nothing was ever the same.

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Aaron Garman
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 - posted 03-09-2017 09:21 PM      Profile for Aaron Garman   Email Aaron Garman   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Are any of the major chains not run by bean counters?

On one hand, reducing the window or doing day/date release with cinemas and the home, maybe it could spur some competition and wipe out a lot of exhibitors that simply put on a bad show. The good ones remain and still continue to make money.

I'm still against it, but it could be the bad medicine a good chunk of this industry probably needs.

AJG

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Bobby Henderson
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 - posted 03-09-2017 10:47 PM      Profile for Bobby Henderson   Email Bobby Henderson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Um, no. If the windows are short enough the movie theater industry will be, unequivocally, dead. I would really like to give the average movie-goer the benefit of the doubt that he is picky about theaters providing good showmanship. But I would be dreaming. Unfortunately I really feel the average customer does not give two shits about it. The common long-time joke about theaters has been "throw out lawn chairs, hang a bed sheet in the yard, throw a movie image on it and customers will show up."

Both good movie theaters and bad theaters will both financially implode if the release window is made brief enough. It won't be any "bad medicine" the movie theater industry needs. Overall it would be poison for the entire movie industry. Like I keep saying, if you get rid of the theaters there will be no more movie industry. It's all fucking TV shows after that.

Some people prefer to stay at home watching movies on the TV set in their living rooms. Nevertheless, those same people know they always have the option to pay a little more to see those real movies in a real movie theater. They think they're playing the system watching real movies at home and saving a bunch of money doing so. Once there are no more movie theaters then there will be no attraction to watching those 2 hour programs. They won't be real movies anymore. They'll just be some damned TV shows.

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Aaron Garman
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 - posted 03-10-2017 12:26 AM      Profile for Aaron Garman   Email Aaron Garman   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I think the line is already blurred for younger demographics on what a real movie is. To many of them it's just "content". And it's that thinking that has studios salivating to get the content in as many hands as possible as fast as possible.

Frankly, and I hate to say this, going to the movies does not feel as special as it used to. Most films I see are unimaginative, over hyped, and presented in a way that is worse than what I can get at home. Why should I go any longer? Oh, and paying a premium to see it on a large screen just stinks. In a way, I kind of hope some of these chains implode. I hate to see good people in the exhibition industry get hurt by that, but how many good ones are still left? How else do we weed out these piss poor exhibitors that are gouging us for a really third rate experience?

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Mike Blakesley
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 - posted 03-10-2017 01:02 AM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
You weed out the poor ones by bringing in better ones.

Carmike was doing an absolutely crappy job in Bozeman, Montana. Cinemark came in, built a beautiful new facility, and within a couple years, ran Carmike out of town. A similar thing happened in Helena. This was before the digital age began, and Carmike theaters in Montana were notoriously hard on film right up until the end...so it was easy for a competitor to outshine them.

I don't know if there was a letter writing campaign, or some Cinemark person happened to vacation in Bozeman and started making phone calls or what, but it happened.

quote: Aaron Garman
it's that thinking that has studios salivating to get the content in as many hands as possible as fast as possible.
Yeah but then the whole "money" issue rears its head again. Young people aren't going to want to spend $50 or whatever to watch a new movie on their devices. They'll turn to piracy in droves rather than pay that much.

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Frank Angel
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 - posted 03-10-2017 04:05 AM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In years past, there was always a given segment of the movie-going public who were torn between, should I go see this one at the theatre or wait for it "to come out on DVD." Difference is, back then that DVD choice was very often a pretty nebulous thing -- when was that release going to actually happen...three months, 6 months, a vague point in some very distant future? The fact that release patterns were all over the map could push an undecided over the fence into the "let's go catch it at the cinema" camp.

Well now the studios want to catch those undecideds on the fence and not only are they chomping at the bit to shorten the HV release window, but it seems like they are making a concerted effort to get a firm grip on the "maybe I'll wait for the DVD" crowd. Now they entice with the DVD "pre-order." They are offering DVD/BR pre-orders to the top box office hits WHILE THEY ARE STILL PLAYING THEATRICALLY! Now you can pre-order hit movies that you see up on the theatre marquee.

And once someone has pre-ordered the home video release, even though officially he can't yet get it physically in his hand, he is committed to seeing it at home and no question he's going to wait and no chance any exhibitor will get his ticket purchase. Anyone who pre-ordered LOGAN (4K no less), or MOANA (3D no less) or HACKSAW RIDGE (4K) or MOONLIGHT has committed to home viewing...even if a buddy comes over and says, hey, lets go catch HACKSAW RIDGE at the AMC tonite, that ship has sailed.

But I think the more insidious effect of these pre-paid DVD & BR arrangements is that even if someone doesn't pre-pay for the BR, psychologically now the video release is a FACT...no guess work any more; it's right there in black and white, that the home video release is imminent. That's a sure way to pull the undecided over the fence into the "I'll wait for the DVD" camp.

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Jesse Skeen
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Still, there are favorite older movies that I have at home that I would still go out and pay to see at a GOOD theater, if any existed in my area. (Part of what I mean by "good" includes a significantly large screen that would never fit in my living room in a billion years, properly proportioned at 2.35 of course.) It seems the chains are doing decent business with "classic" movies lately, even though they're shown in digital letterboxed on medium to small sized screens.

If "movies" of today just become "TV shows", I've got several decades' worth of older movies to catch up on instead.

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Manny Montes
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 - posted 03-10-2017 05:39 AM      Profile for Manny Montes   Email Manny Montes   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Aaron Garman
Are any of the major chains not run by bean counters?
AMCs Adam Aron worked in tourism, hotels and resorts before going to AMC. When I saw that announcement I thought it was pretty different...

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Bobby Henderson
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quote: Aaron Garman
I think the line is already blurred for younger demographics on what a real movie is. To many of them it's just "content". And it's that thinking that has studios salivating to get the content in as many hands as possible as fast as possible.
Here's the catch with that: "content" is not all the same. Some content is cheap. Other content is expensive. Hollywood movies are traditionally very expensive and more time consuming to produce. Their budgets and production schedules are bigger than TV productions and far bigger than web-based productions.

People in younger demographics groups may not care if they see a certain movie in a movie theater, watch it at home on the TV set or even watch it on a mobile device. However, they do care that they are still watching a movie made to show in theaters. They either appreciate the environment of seeing a movie in a theater or they appreciate the perceived big discount of waiting to watch it at home on TV. Either way they still perceive a certain amount of value in the content they are consuming.

If the content is only made to show on TV screens that perceived value will be far less. It's just a TV show. That's the fatal problem with marginalizing movie theaters. With theaters gone the perception of content value will change. Once that happens we'll kiss goodbye any monster budget movies we're used to seeing made for theaters. You're only going to get so much of a production budget and production schedule for making what amounts to a TV show.

quote: Frank Angel
In years past, there was always a given segment of the movie-going public who were torn between, should I go see this one at the theatre or wait for it "to come out on DVD." Difference is, back then that DVD choice was very often a pretty nebulous thing -- when was that release going to actually happen...three months, 6 months, a vague point in some very distant future? The fact that release patterns were all over the map could push an undecided over the fence into the "let's go catch it at the cinema" camp.
Back in the late 1990's when DVD was first getting launched it was typical for a movie release to take around 9 months to arrive on home video. There were some exceptions, like big tent pole summer movie releases being put out on VHS and DVD in time for Christmas. Again, those were exceptions. Some other movies would go more than a year after theatrical release before arriving on home video. Regardless of those differences back then if someone missed a movie during its theatrical run they would be a waiting a long time to watch it on their square TV screen at home.

Back then it was also common for movies to have significantly longer theatrical runs and then take several more months playing out in the International markets. These days the theatrical release schedule is greatly accelerated. It's now common for movies to be released in North America and dozens of other markets overseas simultaneously. Back then the press hype on movie earnings was all about the final gross figure. Now it's all about opening weekend; people have ADHD when it comes to thinking about final gross tally of any new movie.

quote: Frank Angel
Now they entice with the DVD "pre-order." They are offering DVD/BR pre-orders to the top box office hits WHILE THEY ARE STILL PLAYING THEATRICALLY! Now you can pre-order hit movies that you see up on the theatre marquee.
I think that whole ploy is all about movie studios trying to improve cash flow. Get more money into the coffers up front. But, yeah, the pre-order sales pitch does a lot to get cost conscious customers weighing the choice of seeing the show in a theater versus buying (or merely renting) a disc or download later. Today customers don't have to wait long at all for the video.

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