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» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » Film-Yak   » Vacuum Cleaner Anyone? (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Vacuum Cleaner Anyone?
James Mays
Film Handler

Posts: 5
From: Kent, WA, USA
Registered: Dec 2015


 - posted 11-30-2016 03:30 AM      Profile for James Mays     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Not sure if this is the right page to post but, I'm just seeking help for what's the best brand of vacuum cleaner to buy to clean my carpet in my mini movie room. I hope someone could help me on this. Thanks!

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Scott Norwood
Film God

Posts: 7867
From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 11-30-2016 09:03 AM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
For home use, Miele makes good vacuums. They are rather expensive, though. I have a hand-me-down canister model from 1990 (or thereabouts) that I have been using for years with minimal maintenance. Supposedly, the new models are smaller and better.

If I were in the market now, I would also look at Kirbys (supposed to be the best, but super-expensive) and older Electroluxes.

Alternatively, just buy a cheap disposable plastic model and throw it away when it breaks. It might actually be cheaper than buying and maintaining a quality machine, if you can live with the unreliability of the average cheap vacuum.

I have no idea what to buy for commercial use. No doubt, someone here does.

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Frank Cox
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1749
From: Melville Saskatchewan Canada
Registered: Apr 2011


 - posted 11-30-2016 11:44 AM      Profile for Frank Cox   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Cox   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I just buy whatever's on sale when I need a vacuum and generally pay about $100 for one. I'm currently using a Dirt Devil to clean my theatre, and I have a brand new Hoover in a corner of my projection room waiting for the Dirt Devil to break. The Dirt Devil has lasted five or six years so far, actually. I think that's a new record.

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Julian Antos
Film Handler

Posts: 47
From: Chicago, IL, USA
Registered: Nov 2009


 - posted 11-30-2016 01:01 PM      Profile for Julian Antos   Email Julian Antos   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Miele is really the best. Their C1 model is a little over $300. Incredible performance. The Kinoton of Vacuum Cleaners!

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Mike Blakesley
Film God

Posts: 12106
From: Forsyth, Montana
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 11-30-2016 03:20 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Several years ago I came to the realization that it's not necessary (at least here) to vacuum the whole theatre every day. Some days we only get a dozen people in here, and that's counting the crew! So we increased vac life exponentially by only vacuuming once a week during the off season, and two or three times a week during busy times. (More often if really needed, of course.) Dropped popcorn and such is handled with a floor sweeper as it happens.

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Mitchell Dvoskin
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1790
From: West Milford, NJ, USA
Registered: Jan 2001


 - posted 11-30-2016 03:22 PM      Profile for Mitchell Dvoskin   Email Mitchell Dvoskin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I am using (at home) a Kirby that mother bought new in 1960. Still works great. Can't speak to their current models reliability, but their aggressive sales people have generated lots of complaints online.

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James Wyrembelski
Film Handler

Posts: 60
From: Beaverton, MI, USA
Registered: Sep 2015


 - posted 12-04-2016 08:51 PM      Profile for James Wyrembelski   Email James Wyrembelski   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I can attest to Kirby's reliability through the years. They're tanks and require little maintenance. New ones are pricey...for a good reason. You'll never buy another one. I have two...one from 1963 (i keep it because it looks so cool) and the other I use regularly from 1995. You can find used, refurbed ones on places like ebay relatively cheap. Even new models.

The new ones have a built in drive system (since the early 90's)...you can push it with one finger. They have tremendous power, and can convert between a canister mode or upright. They still use bags...which actually are better at filtering than using the HEPA filters contrary to popular belief and generally bagged vacuums last longer....there's less stress on the motor. They're also still made in the USA at the original factory if that matters.

Royal also makes an all metal upright very comparable to Kirby and are generally cheaper. Same good quality too.

I used to repair and sell these and generally push people to buy these over the plastic throw outs.

As far as commercial I'd go with the older style Eureka or Hoover bagged ones. They still make them and the extra long, heavy cord is nice. They're simple and easy to maintain, but they've cheapened out over the years, and you cant use any attachments. They generally go for about 120 bucks. Or even Royal in this case. They're the same as the home models but have a long, heavy duty cord. Insanely reliable, but pricey, and do have attachments available. Kirby would also work, but no long cord makes large commercial applications a bit irritating.

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Rex Oliver
Film Handler

Posts: 65
From: Greenville, NC. USA
Registered: Apr 2013


 - posted 12-05-2016 12:55 AM      Profile for Rex Oliver   Email Rex Oliver   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Glad this question came up----I am a vacuum cleaner collector.Yes,my favorites are Kirbys and the metal Royal uprights.Both are built to last-and yes,use bags.I use the HEPA cloth bags in both.Mile is a great canister vacuum-they will last a long time and properly built.All panels of the machine are gasketed.Sebo is another good machine.Have the newest Kirby-The Avalir model.It has the improved carpet floor cleaner-can be used on carpet or hard floors.Works well.So the Kirby is a floor washer as well a vacuum cleaner.I use a canister for the handtool canister jobs-when you use the Kirby as a "canister" the debris goes thru the suction fan and the motor is running at higher speed.Fan breakage is a risk.Another old favorite-maybe you guys that own or run theaters have seen or use it-the NSS M1-a large,metal commercial "canister" vacuum.It has the bag on the top-and the debis goes thu the fan into the top mounted bag.Heavy things such as pebbles,coins,nails stay in the "snout" section-the NSS folks call the machine "The Pig"-because it loves dirt.Have four in my collection-SUPER machines.Use mine with a "Volt" cordless powernozzle-this has its own booster fan and works well-can be used with any canister vacuum-or central vacuum hose that fits the Volts wand.And I have several central vac units in my collection.The is a website devoted to vacuum collectors-VCC-"Vacuumland"They have some rather interesting and even heated discussions about vacuums-esp bagless vs bagged!

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Brian Poole
Film Handler

Posts: 4
From: Chicago, Illinois, USA
Registered: Oct 2016


 - posted 12-07-2016 04:17 AM      Profile for Brian Poole     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
My Hoover cleaner works well!

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Rex Oliver
Film Handler

Posts: 65
From: Greenville, NC. USA
Registered: Apr 2013


 - posted 12-07-2016 04:35 AM      Profile for Rex Oliver   Email Rex Oliver   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The vintage REAL "Hoovers" work well,too.These were the genuine Hoovers.Its just a name now owned by a large company.I have a few Hoover Convertibles in my collection-GREAT vacuums-simple,does the job!!Does well as a carpet vacuum-but NOT o good with the hose.

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Jim Cassedy
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1511
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Dec 2006


 - posted 12-07-2016 10:07 AM      Profile for Jim Cassedy   Email Jim Cassedy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In my younger days, I was quite a dumpster diver.

Vacuum cleaners were always a treasure to find, being s source of wheels,
wires, switches, motors, etc from which I could build other things.

Two brands I rarely ever found in a trash heap were Kirby and Oreck.

I can attest to what Mitchell and James say about Kirbys. My mom had
one from the early 1960's and she gave out before the vacuum cleaner
did. It's now owned by an elderly aunt, and is still going strong.
(The vacuum cleaner!; my aunt - - not so much so... [Roll Eyes] )

I have an Oreck upright. I see them used commercially in a lot of the
hotels and convention centers I do shows at. They seem to be well built,
and I've been very happy with mine.

I'm not too impressed by the fancy new Dysan vacuums. They may look
modern, and perhaps they work well, but based on the number of them
I've seen discarded in trash piles, I get the impression they're not built
to have a very long lifespan.

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Scott Norwood
Film God

Posts: 7867
From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 12-07-2016 10:42 AM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
As I understand it, the issue with the Oreck is that it works well for the type of short pile carpet that is normally used in commercial environments (hotel lobbies, etc.), but that they do not work as well with the thicker carpets that tend to be used in homes. Maybe Jim can comment on that.

Their biggest advantage seems to be their light weight.

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Jim Cassedy
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1511
From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Dec 2006


 - posted 12-07-2016 11:42 AM      Profile for Jim Cassedy   Email Jim Cassedy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well, Scott, you might be right about the carpet piles.

I can't really judge, since all my floors are either
hardwood or tile, and this hallway runner is the only
thing I have that comes close to being a 'rug', except
for a couple of rug-mats by my kitchen & bathroom sinks.
The Oreck does a great job on these, as well as in the
hallway in the common area outside my front door, but
this runner, the mats & outer hall carpets are short-pile.
 -
I spent a few days in a Holiday Inn outside of Phoenix
last week, and I noticed when I was checking out that
the cleaning staff there were using Orecks.

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James Wyrembelski
Film Handler

Posts: 60
From: Beaverton, MI, USA
Registered: Sep 2015


 - posted 12-07-2016 03:55 PM      Profile for James Wyrembelski   Email James Wyrembelski   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In my experience Oreck tends to be pretty weak on anything except short pile carpets. You don't really need much suction on anything low pile or commercial....commercial tends to be glued down anyways, so powerful suction isn't really needed.

Home applications you need good "lift" where air is actually lifting the carpet up off the floor and traveling through the pile while the beater brush vibrates the carpet loosening anything stuck in there. That's why powerful cleaners like Kirby do well in a home setting, the fan is right above the beater brush allowing for a great air seal.

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Frank Angel
Film God

Posts: 5116
From: Brooklyn NY USA
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 12-22-2016 07:24 PM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We are pretty lucky...our theatre complex of 4 theatres was built in the mid-50s and in many areas, it was seriously over-built -- i.e., built to last. One of the features they designed into the building was a central vacuum system using two massive units the size of Mac trucks in the basement with piping that allowed hoses to be hooked up to brass intake openings flush with the wall in multiple parts of each theatre. Suction at the end of that hose is fierce. With a 50 ft hose, you could reach any part of the theatre. The company has gone out of business since, but the things were so well built that other than oiling and cleaning the motors, they work as well today as they did when the place opened. Very neat not to have to lug a vacuum clearer around a 2500 seat theatre.

For the few places in the builds where there are no intake nozzles, we just use ShopVacs; these things produce suction exponentially greater than home-style vacuum cleaners. But one con is their limited types of available attachments for them, BUT, if you like to add the better designed and more elaborate attachments that are found on home-type vacuums, you can easily use an opening reduction adapter that will allow you to use the more fancy attachments.

We found on carpet attachment that used the suction of the vacuum to spin a brush in the attachment head much like those that have motors in the attachment itself. With a ShopVac hooked up to that thing, the brush spins like it going to fly out of the attachment and go airborne.

Thing is, ShopVacs can be had for MUCH cheaper than consumer-type vacuum cleaners -- much more suck for the buck, as it were. [Big Grin]

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