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Author Topic: Movie Poster Storage
Scott Oakley
Film Handler

Posts: 10
From: Medford, MA, USA
Registered: Nov 2000


 - posted 02-09-2001 11:44 PM      Profile for Scott Oakley   Email Scott Oakley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Does anyone know of a good way to store posters? I have about 200 movie posters stored in shipping tubes in my closet. I've been trying to find something else to put them in where I could lay them flat and possibly store them under a bed. I have been looking all over the place for something big enough to hold a 27 x 40 poster and haven't had any luck yet. (with the possible exception being those large steel flat files, but those are just way too expensive!) I'd appreciate any ideas or suggestions anyone has...

Randy Stankey
Film God

Posts: 6403
From: Erie, Pennsylvania
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 02-10-2001 10:53 AM      Profile for Randy Stankey   Email Randy Stankey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The way museum archives store large documents, such as posters, is called MYLAR ENCAPSULATION. It's a fancy-sounding name but it's really simple in reality.

Find yourself some large sheets of clear Mylar. It has to be Mylar. Other plastics give off polyvilyl cloride (PVC) vapors which will destroy the paper. Get enough to cover both sides of the posters and leave a border around the edge of about 1 to 2 inches. (approx. 3 to 5 cm)

Lay a sheet down on a table (or clean floor) and use double-faced tape to make a border around the poster on 3 sides of the Mylar rectangle. Place the top sheet on top and stick it down so there are no wrinkles.

What you now have is a giant envelope you can slide the poster into. Once the poster is in, seal up the last side.

When you want to hang it, you can use the border of the Mylar to stick tape (or tacks) to without hurting the poster inside. Some museums even go so far as to put metal grommets into the border for hanging.

Storage should be done by laying the poster flat, of course. Keep them in a cool, dark room. Humidity control is a good idea, too. At least get a humidity guage. Museums usually do this by keeping large posters and pictures in drawers. If you have seen a blue print cabinet with the giant drawers, you know what I'm talking about. Often they have humidity control built right into the cabinet.

I wouldn't get all THAT fancy, though. I'd just encapsulate them and store them flat, under the bed. If you can come across a blue print drawer somewhere, like a flea market, etc. then I would snag it.

Gordon McLeod
Film God

Posts: 9435
From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 02-10-2001 11:17 AM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Bankersbox (they make the folded file folder storage boxes) make a carboard version of a engineers blueprint file cabinet. They are relativly inexpensive and are available for esize 36"x48" prints

Randy Stankey
Film God

Posts: 6403
From: Erie, Pennsylvania
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 02-10-2001 11:49 AM      Profile for Randy Stankey   Email Randy Stankey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
What about acid / formaldehide vapors given off by the cardboard? You'd have to make certain that the Mylar "envelopes" are completely air tight.

Matt Gardner
Film Handler

Posts: 15
From: Charleston, S.C., USA
Registered: Aug 2000


 - posted 02-10-2001 12:30 PM      Profile for Matt Gardner   Email Matt Gardner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I used a standee box to store my posters. Its holding about 250 posters flat right now and has plenty of room left over. When I add new posters I just slide the box back under my bed totally out of sight. Its kind of a pain looking for a certain poster but if you make a list they become easy to find.

Paul Mayer
Oh get out of it Melvin, before it pulls you under!

Posts: 3835
From: Albuquerque, NM
Registered: Feb 2000


 - posted 02-10-2001 02:31 PM      Profile for Paul Mayer   Author's Homepage   Email Paul Mayer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
There is acid-free backing stock in various thicknesses, and Virgin Polyethylene or Mylar sleeves and bags (Polyolifin Shrink Film too) made just for long term storage purposes--check out the ads for the stuff in almost any issue of "The Big Reel."

http://www.bagsunlimited.com (practically in John Pytlak's back yard )

I'm facing the same issue myself as I've started collecting Japanese anime movie posters. BTW Japanese standard sizes for posters are 20x29" and 29x40"...



Gordon McLeod
Film God

Posts: 9435
From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 02-10-2001 03:43 PM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I would assume that bankers box uses a low acid material since they are designed for longterm storage



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