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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Ground Level   » Meet the Lone Loser in MoviePass Hitting 1 Million Members (Page 0)

 
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Author Topic: Meet the Lone Loser in MoviePass Hitting 1 Million Members
Monte L Fullmer
Film God

Posts: 8367
From: Nampa, Idaho, USA
Registered: Nov 2004


 - posted 10-24-2018 05:45 PM      Profile for Monte L Fullmer   Email Monte L Fullmer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
And prob come out good on the P&L statements with this spinoff.

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Jonathan M. Crist
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 527
From: Hershey, PA, USA
Registered: Apr 2000


 - posted 02-13-2019 02:13 PM      Profile for Jonathan M. Crist   Email Jonathan M. Crist   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
To the Surprise of no one Helios & Matheson (parent of MoviePass) has been de-listed from Nasdaq stock exchange effective February 13, 2019.

Helios and Matheson Analytics, the parent company of movie-ticket subscription service MoviePass, has been kicked off the Nasdaq, it disclosed in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday. It will now trade over the counter under the same ticker, HMNY. Helios had failed to meet the Nasdaq's listing standards by trading under $1 per share since July. In December, the Nasdaq sent Helios a warning that the company would delisted, but Helios appealed the decision. The effort failed. "The Company timely appealed the delisting notice and appeared in front of the Panel on January 31, 2019," Helios wrote in the filing. "The Panel issued a decision on February 11, 2019, and determined to delist the Company's common stock from The Nasdaq Capital Market. The suspension of trading in the Company's common stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market will be effective at the open of business on February 13, 2019." Helios raised its profile in the summer of 2017 when it acquired MoviePass and lowered the service's monthly subscription price to $9.95 a month to see one movie in theaters per day. The move led to millions of new subscribers, but also hundreds of millions of dollars in losses. Helios has primarily used the selling of billions of new shares to cover its losses, and has seen its stock lose over 99% of its value. Despite this, the company said in a statement to Business Insider that "HMNY's delisting has no effect on the day-to-day business operations of HMNY or its subsidiaries, including MoviePass and MoviePass Films."

In January, Helios announced that it had sent a registration statement to the SEC to make MoviePass a separate public company. In a statement Tuesday to Business Insider, Helios said that effort would continue. "HMNY will consider applying to be listed on an exchange again should it meet the applicable listing criteria in the future," the company also noted. Helios had a complicated history as a Nasdaq-listed company before getting kicked off. Before the MoviePass era, the New York outpost of Helios and Matheson was controlled by an Indian company (Helios and Matheson Information Technology), which stands accused of defrauding at least 5,000 creditors in India, including banks and senior citizens.

Here is Helios' full statement on its delisting: "HMNY's delisting has no effect on the day-to-day business operations of HMNY or its subsidiaries, including MoviePass and MoviePass Films. HMNY expects that its common stock will begin trading on the over-the-counter market on Wednesday, February 13, 2019. HMNY will consider applying to be listed on an exchange again should it meet the applicable listing criteria in the future. In the meantime, HMNY is proceeding with its planning efforts to effectuate a partial spin-off of MoviePass Entertainment Holdings Inc. ("MoviePass Entertainment"), which would take ownership of HMNY's film industry related assets, including its shares of MoviePass Inc., membership interest in MoviePass Films and MoviePass Ventures and the Moviefone entertainment information service. The spin-off remains subject to numerous conditions, as previously described in HMNY's SEC filings."


Movie Pass Parent DeListed From NASDAQ Exchange

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Marcel Birgelen
Film God

Posts: 3056
From: Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands
Registered: Feb 2012


 - posted 02-13-2019 03:03 PM      Profile for Marcel Birgelen   Email Marcel Birgelen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The thing still isn't dead yet?

Apparently, their pricing is now zip-code dependent. Maybe it's sensing my non-US IP address or it's just the head that forgot the body to tell it's already dead? But, I've entered a few zip codes, one of mid-town Manhattan, the other one an old one of where I've actually lived for a few months and one of a friend of mine in Austin (Texas), yet no pricing information shows up.

Their theater finder appears to be dead for me, too.

Also, if you want to reactivate your dead moviepass, you seem to be out of luck.

Fortunately, you can still buy MoviePass Mugs.

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Frank Cox
Film God

Posts: 2138
From: Melville Saskatchewan Canada
Registered: Apr 2011


 - posted 03-19-2019 11:36 PM      Profile for Frank Cox   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Cox   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Apparently it's not dead yet:

MoviePass brings back its unlimited movie plan

quote:
MoviePass brings back its unlimited movie plan, with a limited time price of $9.95

MoviePass is bringing back a version of the plan that made it so popular in the first place — a subscription where you pay a monthly fee and get an unlimited number of 2D movie tickets.

MoviePass Uncapped will have a regular price of $19.95 per month, but the company is offering cheaper deals for what it says is a limited time. If you’re willing to pay for a full year (via ACH payment), it will cost the same as that original unlimited plan, namely $9.95 per month. If you don’t want to make a full-year commitment, it will cost $14.95 per month.

Now, you may be thinking that this kind of deal is exactly what got MoviePass into so much trouble last year, to the point where it nearly ran out of money and began announcing new pricing plans and restrictions on a seemingly constant basis.

However, the company’s announcement today includes multiple references to its ability to “combat violations” of MoviePass’ terms of use. And those terms do say that “MoviePass has the right to limit the selection of movies and/or the times of available movies should your individual use adversely impact MoviePass’s system-wide capacity or the availability of the Service for other subscribers.”

So if you’re a heavy MoviePass user, the plan may not be truly unlimited.

In addition, you’ll only be able to reserve tickets three hours before showtime, and you’ll need to check in to the theater between 10 and 30 minutes before the movie starts.

This new plan replaces the ones announced in December. If you’ve already signed up, you can stick to those subscriptions, but new users won’t have that option.

In a statement, Ted Farnsworth, CEO of MoviePass parent company Helios and Matheson Analytics, said:

We are – and have been – listening to our subscribers every day, and we understand that an uncapped subscription plan at the $9.95 price point is the most appealing option to our subscribers. While we’ve had to modify our service a number of times in order to continue delivering a movie-going experience to our subscribers, with this new offering we are doing everything we can to bring people a version of the service that originally won their hearts.


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Bobby Henderson
"Ask me about Trajan."

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From: Lawton, OK, USA
Registered: Apr 2001


 - posted 03-20-2019 12:06 AM      Profile for Bobby Henderson   Email Bobby Henderson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Techcrunch article
In addition, you’ll only be able to reserve tickets three hours before showtime, and you’ll need to check in to the theater between 10 and 30 minutes before the movie starts.
So basically they're selling standby movie-going? I suppose this approach could work on movies a couple or so weeks after their debut in theaters with regular un-assigned seating. It would be lousy for premium screens or any theaters with reserved seats. Recently when my girlfriend and I watched Captain Marvel I had to buy my seats for that Sunday afternoon show the previous Friday afternoon in order to get good seats.

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Marcel Birgelen
Film God

Posts: 3056
From: Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands
Registered: Feb 2012


 - posted 03-22-2019 04:40 AM      Profile for Marcel Birgelen   Email Marcel Birgelen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It's not the first time we've had this discussion, but I'd say that introducing the "standby experience" to the moviegoing experience will be the end of it.

Since everybody now carries their own "TV set" in the form of a smartphone, the function of the theater as a place to get the latest news, will never ever return. Therefore, going to a theater, is a special event.

While going on vacation might also be considered a special event, flying coach as a standby passenger on a low-cost airline isn't usually seen as the highlight of that special event, it's the necessary evil.

Movie theaters have to offer a moviegoing experience that outperforms watching the same movie a few weeks later at home. If the experience is comparable to flying on a low-cost airline, I'd rather stay at home. Nobody is forcing me to watch that movie in those circumstances.

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Mike Blakesley
Film God

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From: Forsyth, Montana
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 - posted 03-22-2019 12:16 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I'm surprised Farnsworth still has a job. Although who would want to replace him?

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Martin McCaffery
Film God

Posts: 2437
From: Montgomery, AL
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 03-22-2019 12:41 PM      Profile for Martin McCaffery   Author's Homepage   Email Martin McCaffery   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
So you thought it couldn't get worse?

GIZMODO

quote:

MoviePass Co-Founder's New Startup Must Be Stopped
Melanie Ehrenkranz

The co-founder of MoviePass wants to make going to the movies more affordable, so long as you’re comfortable submitting to mandatory ad watching and creepy surveillance tech. PreShow, an invitation-only service launched by Stacy Spikes, uses facial recognition software to make sure you are actively tuning into a hellacious amount of ads. In return for this indentured consumerism, you get a free movie ticket.

According to the PreShow Kickstarter, which launched on Thursday, the company uses its “proprietary facial identification software” to ensure you actually watch the 15 to 20 minutes of branded content on your device. “The motion detector automatically pauses playback if you have to step away,” according to the project page. “You can resume watching anytime at your leisure.”

It’s not until you’ve watched the entire ad that you’ll be credited your free movie ticket. The Kickstarter page states that privacy is a “top concern” for the company, and that while no users are recorded and no “personally identifiable data is shared,” they can share aggregated and anonymized data to their partners. So your uniquely personal habits may, as they claim, remain private, but the accumulated data still offers brands insight into the behavior of certain groups of people. That’s valuable and exploitable information for a company that profits exactly from that.

“Well, why can’t you have an ad-supported version that will allow you to go to movies for free?” Spikes told TechCrunch.

It’s possible that PreShow is mostly a B2B play to license their watch-the-fucking-ad technology to third parties. In the world of movie business model “disruption,” such licensing is common. Both MoviePass and competitor Sinemia have attempted to do this with their ticket-subscription tech.

Of course, as we’ve increasingly come to understand, “free” is a loaded word when it comes to reaping the benefits in the digital age—a free service oftentimes means sacrificing your time and your privacy. In PreShow’s case, it dangles the promise of a “free” movie-going experience for what’s a stone’s throw from clamping your eyes open to make sure you consume the necessary content.


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Frank Cox
Film God

Posts: 2138
From: Melville Saskatchewan Canada
Registered: Apr 2011


 - posted 03-22-2019 01:31 PM      Profile for Frank Cox   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Cox   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If it's like other facial recognition stuff you can probably get around it by propping a photo of someone in front of the camera and then coming back in twenty minutes.

But still... how silly can you get? It sounds like it should be a joke, but of course it isn't.

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Harold Hallikainen
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 868
From: Denver, CO, USA
Registered: Aug 2009


 - posted 03-22-2019 05:39 PM      Profile for Harold Hallikainen   Author's Homepage   Email Harold Hallikainen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
And, now for another perspective!

https://oracledispatch.com/2019/03/20/why-helios-and-matheson-analytics-inc-otcmktshmny-shares-just-caught-fire/

Why Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc (OTCMKTS:HMNY) Shares Just Caught Fire
By James Hudson - March 20, 2019
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Shares of Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc (OTCMKTS:HMNY) boomed higher on Tuesday following an article in the Financial Times outlining the return of the company’s unlimited movie pass just months after the cinema subscription service moved to cap viewings to 3 times a month.

According to the article, “MoviePass launched a new “uncapped” subscription plan — which includes unlimited 2D movies in its theatre network that consists of 30,000 screens — for a limited time at a cost of $9.95 a month for a 12-month subscription, available immediately. For those who do not want to be locked into a year-long contract, the company is also offering an uncapped plan at a cost of $14.95 per month. MoviePass said the rate for both plans would rise to $19.95 a month when the two offers expire.”

Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc (OTCMKTS:HMNY) trumpets itself as a company that provides a range of information technology (IT) solutions to Fortune 1000 companies and other organizations in the United States.

The company’s services include application value management, application development, integration, independent validation, infrastructure, information management, and analytics services. Its clients operate in various industries, including banking, financial services, automotive, insurance, and healthcare.

The company was formerly known as Helios and Matheson Information Technology Inc. and changed its name to Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc. in May 2013. Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc. was founded in 1982 and is headquartered in New York, New York.

MoviePass Inc. is a marketing technology platform enhancing the exploration of film and the moviegoing experience. As a premier movie-theater subscription service, MoviePass provides film enthusiasts the ability to attend select new movies in theaters. The service is now accepted at theaters everywhere in the U.S. Visit us at moviepass.com.

MoviePass Films LLC is dedicated to supporting independent filmmakers and distributors by collaborating with creatives, co-acquiring equity stakes in films and offering them enhanced performance in the theatrical window. A joint venture of Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc. and Emmett Furla Oasis (EFO) Films, MoviePass Films focuses on studio-driven content and new film production for theatrical release and other distribution channels, with the goal of democratizing the film production experience by bridging the gap between moviegoers and film industry endeavors.

According to company materials, “Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc. (OTC:HMNY) (“Helios”) currently owns approximately 92% of the outstanding shares (excluding options and warrants) of MoviePass, a premier movie-theater subscription service, 100% of the outstanding equity interests of MoviePass Ventures LLC, and 51% of the outstanding equity interests of MoviePass Films. Helios also owns Moviefone™, a multimedia media information and advertising service. Helios’ holdings include RedZone Map™, a safety and navigation app for iOS and Android users, and a community-based ecosystem that features a socially empowered safety map app that enhances mobile GPS navigation using advanced proprietary technology. Helios is headquartered in New York and quoted on the OTC Market under the symbol HMNY. For more information, visit us at www.hmny.com.”

As noted above, HMNY was just featured in an FT article about the return of its unlimited movie pass. The chart shows 63% during the past month in terms of shareholder gains in the listing. Moreover, the stock has benefitted from a jump in recent trading volume to the tune of 0% above the average volume levels in play in this stock over the longer term.

“While we’ve had to modify our service a number of times in order to continue delivering a moviegoing experience to our subscribers, with this new offering we are doing everything we can to bring people a version of the service that originally won their hearts,” said chief executive Ted Farnsworth.

Earning a current market cap value of $23.22M, HMNY has a significant war chest ($4.9M) of cash on the books, which compares with about $54.7M in total current liabilities. HMNY is pulling in trailing 12-month revenues of $211.7M. In addition, the company is seeing major top-line growth, with y/y quarterly revenues growing at 6834.2%. This may be a very interesting story and we will look forward to updating it again soon. Sign-up for continuing coverage on shares of $HMNY stock, as well as other hot stock picks, get our free newsletter today and get our next breakout pick!

Disclosure: we hold no position in $HMNY, either long or short, and we have not been compensated for this article.

So, is "catching fire" getting up to a penny per share? $23.2M market cap, $4.9M cash, $54.7M current liabilities (what about long term liabilities?). Looks like a great buy to me! (as we say in ham radio, hi hi hi).

Harold

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Martin McCaffery
Film God

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From: Montgomery, AL
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 - posted 03-23-2019 08:55 AM      Profile for Martin McCaffery   Author's Homepage   Email Martin McCaffery   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
What is this in theatre network of 30,000 screens it claims to have?

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Frank Cox
Film God

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From: Melville Saskatchewan Canada
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 - posted 04-18-2019 05:31 PM      Profile for Frank Cox   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Cox   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
MoviePass Has Lost Over 90% of Its Subscribers in Less Than a Year

quote:


MoviePass users apparently hit the exits en masse after it scaled back the number of movies users could see each month: The flailing cinema-subscription provider has seen its subscriber rolls plunge from a peak of more than 3 million to just 225,000 in under a year, according to a new report.

The numbers were reported by Business Insider, which cited “internal data” it had obtained. Asked for comment, a MoviePass spokeswoman declined to confirm the subscriber figure.

In June 2018, MoviePass claimed it had signed up more than 3 million subscribers for its $9.95 monthly plan, which let customers see one movie every single day. But that proved unsustainable, and MoviePass was forced to change that to a three-movies-per-month plan. In August 2018, MoviePass Inc. began to convert subscribers on annual subscription plans to the three-movies-per-month subscription plan, by giving annual subscribers the option to either cancel or refund their annual subscription or continue on the new three-movies-per-month subscription plan.

Evidently, over 90% of MoviePass’ previous subscribers didn’t care to continue paying for the service given the dramatically scaled-backed terms.

Last month, MoviePass introduced a refashioned “unlimited” plan, dubbed Uncapped, priced at $14.95 per month (or $119.4 per year), to again allow customers to see one movie daily. But it comes with big caveats, described by MoviePass like this: “Your movie choices may be restricted due to excessive individual usage which negatively impacts system-wide capacity.” According to the BI report, MoviePass has signed up only about 13,000 new subscribers Uncapped launched in mid-March.

As of March 21, 2019, Helios & Matheson Analytics (MoviePass’ parent company) said it had cash on hand of about $2.8 million and approximately $13.1 million on deposit with its merchant and fulfillment processors related to subscription revenues.

Last month, Helios and Matheson said it raised a $6 million new round of financing from “certain institutional investors,” which closed March 25. The company said it would use the $5.56 million net proceeds (after placement-agent fees) “to accelerate MoviePass’ product development, fine tune its subscription technology, and increase MoviePass Films’ investment in new films.”

Helios & Matheson last filed financial results for the September 2018 quarter. Last month, it restated results for the first nine months of 2018 — saying it had a net loss of $256.4 million (versus $246.9 million previously) and an operating loss of $327.4 million (versus $320 million before). The company’s revenue for the first three quarters of 2018 was restated as $198.3 million (compared with $204.9 million)

HMNY said those misstatements were the result of “the erroneous recognition of up to approximately $5.9 million of revenue from certain MoviePass subscriptions that were in a suspended state due to changes made to the MoviePass subscription service that had not yet been consented to by the applicable subscribers.” The company also included $700,000 in revenue from the sale of subscriptions by Costco, but those subscriptions were refunded and MoviePass didn’t factor that into its earnings.

Last fall, the New York Attorney General opened a securities-fraud probe into whether Helios and Matheson misled investors. Among other legal woes, MoviePass also is the target of a class-action lawsuit by subscribers claiming the the change in the “unlimited” plan was a deceptive “bait-and-switch” tactic.

Separately, MoviePass is suing rival Sinemia, alleging patent infringement. A judge earlier this month allowed MoviePass’ lawsuit to proceed.


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Lyle Romer
Phenomenal Film Handler

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From: Davie, FL, USA
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 - posted 04-21-2019 10:40 AM      Profile for Lyle Romer   Email Lyle Romer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Frank Cox
If it's like other facial recognition stuff you can probably get around it by propping a photo of someone in front of the camera and then coming back in twenty minutes.
I'm sure they can put things in the algorithm to look for blinks, subtle eye movement and subtle head movement. I'm sure somebody could defeat it but it would be more effort than watching the ads.

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Mitchell Dvoskin
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1844
From: West Milford, NJ, USA
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 - posted 04-29-2019 04:57 PM      Profile for Mitchell Dvoskin   Email Mitchell Dvoskin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Another one bites the dust:

From USA Today via Yahoo News.
quote:

As moviegoers rush to the theaters in record numbers to find out which Marvel heroes will be resurrected from the dead in "Avengers: Endgame," the movie subscription service Sinemia announced that it's game over for the company's U.S. operations – effective immediately.

The MoviePass competitor announced on its website Thursday that it's calling it quits just as the latest Avengers movie began breaking box office records on its first day.

"Today, with a heavy heart, we’re announcing that Sinemia is closing its doors and ending operations in the US," a notice on the company's website reads. "We want to sincerely thank our customers that believed in us and helped us along the way."
Why the sudden shutdown?

Sinemia, which billed itself as a sustainable cinema subscription service, cited “unexpected legal proceedings” and a lack of “funds required to continue operations.”

The movie-subscription company has been beleaguered by lawsuits in the past year, including a class-action suit from customers saying they were the victims of a “bait-and-switch” scheme involving hidden processing fees.

Sinemia also faces a lawsuit from rival MoviePass, which accused the Turkish company of stealing patented features in its app.

"We are all witnessing that the future of moviegoing is evolving through movie ticket subscriptions," Sinemia said in a statement on its website.

"However, we didn’t see a path to sustainability as an independent movie ticket subscription service in the face of competition from movie theaters as they build their own subscriptions."
What are my other options?

As movie lovers look for thrifty ways to save money on cinema tickets, theater chains have smelled blood in the water, devising their own cash-saving subscription plans to please customers.

Cinemark Movie Club, for instance, costs $8.99 per month and provides 20 percent off concessions, rollover and companion tickets, reserved seating and no online fees.

AMC continues to gain traction with its multiplex subscription service AMC Stubs A-List, which gives film lovers a way to see three screenings a week for roughly $20 a month.

Meanwhile, MoviePass has experimented with a range of subscription schemes in the past year. Most recently it rolled out an “uncapped” movie-per-day plan that costs $9.95 a month if you pay for 12 months upfront.
Ok, so can I get my money back?

Sinemia's announcement does not say whether customers who paid for yearly plans up front would get partial refunds.

However, a Reddit thread says some users who paid annual memberships are receiving pro-rated refunds from Chase.

Still, you may not get your money back directly from Sinemia for the time being, seeing as though the company has just filed for bankruptcy in Delaware. In the filing, Sinemia listed $1.2 million in assets and $158,000 in liabilities (as well as the pending cases).

USA TODAY reached out to the company to get more information about refunds. This story will be updated accordingly.
What's next for Sinemia?

An earlier report by Bloomberg suggested that shutting down the service allows Sinemia to focus their business on helping existing theater chains build subscription plans.

For now, Sinemia still operates in Canada, Australia and the U.K. It’s not immediately clear what the company's plans are for those other countries.


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Andrew Maddison
Film Handler

Posts: 13
From: Coventry, West Midlands, UK
Registered: Sep 2007


 - posted 05-10-2019 04:27 AM      Profile for Andrew Maddison   Email Andrew Maddison   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
For now, Sinemia still operates in Canada, Australia and the U.K. It’s not immediately clear what the company's plans are for those other countries.
I'm not sure Sinemia really "operate" properly in the UK - I signed up for their 3 movies a month card and they didn't manage to send me a card within 4 months (Sinemia's argument against my chargeback request was that the product had gone fully online in the meantime, but a lot of cinemas' terms and conditions require you to have the physical card used to book your tickets, and when I signed up it stated that it would come with a physical card).
I would have used it for trips to iSense, IMAX (70mm or with Laser) or Dolby Cinema screens which would have made the subscription fee worthwhile, so I was quite disappointed that they hadn't held up their end of the deal.

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