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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Ground Level   » ticket stubs (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: ticket stubs
Ramin Hashemi
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 129
From: Houston TX
Registered: Sep 2004


 - posted 11-12-2004 08:11 PM      Profile for Ramin Hashemi   Email Ramin Hashemi   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
How many of you keep the ticket stubs and bag them at the end of the night? What is the purpose of this exercise? I have been doing it for "audit"purposes, but there is so many ways around it.

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Jason Black
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1723
From: Myrtle Beach, SC, USA
Registered: Nov 2000


 - posted 11-12-2004 09:32 PM      Profile for Jason Black   Author's Homepage   Email Jason Black   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Ramin,

This is dictated by individual corporate policy or theatre level management. True, there are ways around it, but if every member of the staff is doing his/her job properly, each ticket would be accounted for in the given daily bag, EVERY DAY.

Your auditor simply pulls back your daily report(s) for said day, pulls the bag, and counts stubs. If they are really anal, they can compare sold categories to the actual ticket prices. This would take some time, of course, but in the event that someone is expected of 'relieving the company of funds' this proves to be a somewhat effective method of verifying a problem. There are, however, more effective and efficient methods of catching a thief....

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Chris Brown
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 105
From: Fairport, NY, USA
Registered: Nov 2004


 - posted 11-13-2004 01:15 AM      Profile for Chris Brown   Author's Homepage   Email Chris Brown   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We didnt used to do this until about a year ago...but we really got reamed by an auditor and so after that we got much more strict about it. We usually try and have the ushers rubber-band the tickets they take throughout the night, so that at the end, it is just a matter of counting groups of 100. Much easier that way.

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Chase Hanson
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 172
From: San Diego, CA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted 11-13-2004 02:09 AM      Profile for Chase Hanson   Email Chase Hanson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
we've done this for as long as I have worked at my theater, im pretty sure that its company policy. We usually keep a Quarters worth of ticket stubs on hand.

As a note, I dont really understand why they hard count every bag. I think it would be easier and more cost effective to weigh bags of stubs and have a cheat sheet in 100 stub incrament. If the numbers arent even close than you hard count...if its within a nominal margin than you call it even.

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Mike Blakesley
Film God

Posts: 12492
From: Forsyth, Montana
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 11-13-2004 01:08 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It's also in film company contracts that you have to keep the stubs.

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Mike Spaeth
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1112
From: Hampton, GA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 11-13-2004 01:11 PM      Profile for Mike Spaeth   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Spaeth   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Century keeps no ticket stubs. They print a hard ticket that the tear to "mark" it and return it to you

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Brad Allen
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 688
From: Evansville, IN, USA
Registered: May 2000


 - posted 11-14-2004 12:27 PM      Profile for Brad Allen   Email Brad Allen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yep, it's required by the film co's contract.
And your supposed to keep them I believe for 2 yrs.
It's for the film co's auditors, not the theatres owners.

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Gordon McLeod
Film God

Posts: 9470
From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 11-14-2004 12:46 PM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
For years the canada customs and revinue agency (the fed tax man) required ticket stubs for an audit the register tape wasn't accepatble so they had to be kept for 7 years
Many theatres used to thread them on a string by date

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David Yauch
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 206
From: Mesa, AZ, USA
Registered: Oct 2004


 - posted 11-15-2004 01:26 AM      Profile for David Yauch   Email David Yauch   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We keep ours around in giant envelopes until the audit fairies come and wisk them away in the night...

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John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 11-15-2004 09:59 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"Paper Trails" are important for checking the integrity of both theatre personnel and voting machines.

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Frank Angel
Film God

Posts: 5200
From: Brooklyn NY USA
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 11-15-2004 10:24 AM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
For years before the computerized ticketing system, keeping the ticket stubs presented way for the distribs to get a fairly secure way of checking the veracity of the theatre's box office report. You had to give the opening ticket number and the closing ticket number on a roll. Rolls were consecutively numbered, usually 10,000 tickets per roll, with at least 5 or 10 different colors. Naturally there are ways around this, but it would take collusion on the part of a number of employees. The consecutively numbered ticket rolls and colors that provided the security factor.

If a distrib wanted to check a theatre, they would send in a checker or "clicker" as we called them. He buys a ticket and then goes into the theatre and counts the heads. He then asks for the ticket stubs. If things are on the up-and-up, the only ticket numbers in that bad will be between the starting number on the report and the number on his ticket; anything else is suspect. Unless the theatre had unlimited number of rolls at various pricing and various colors where an employee could doctor the numbers, pulling tickets out of other rolls, it was a pretty foolproof system.

We still fill out box office reports that call for a starting and ending number, but of course there are no preprinted ticket rolls anymore; the computer just spits out the ticket with all the information on it. The computer tells me the number of tickets sold and I use 00001 as the starting number. I never could understand how computer generated ticket sales can offer any easy verification for the distrib. I can make the computer say anything I want. For verification, the checker would have to come in and confiscate the computer hard-drive.

I wonder what everyone did with all those neat ticket roll machines.

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Jason Black
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1723
From: Myrtle Beach, SC, USA
Registered: Nov 2000


 - posted 11-15-2004 10:51 AM      Profile for Jason Black   Author's Homepage   Email Jason Black   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Auto-Maticket or something to that effect.

Fastest machines in the world. I never had one go down, never had to adjust the cutting blades. You simply loaded your ticket stacks (I guess they would have taken rolls also), hit the appropriate number of for the tickets desired and voila...

I miss them... they are nostaligic to say the least...

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Dave Williams
Wet nipple scene

Posts: 1836
From: Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 11-15-2004 12:38 PM      Profile for Dave Williams   Author's Homepage   Email Dave Williams   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
There is a new way around stubs.

It is upc encoding and verification.

Tickets are printed and each one has its own identifier code. Only the ones that have been sold are valid by the reader.

you must have your ticket for entry or reentry. the usher carries a reader that is connected to the network system via wireless. It reads the ticket and instantly verifies the validity of it. No valid ticket, no entry. PERIOD.

Cost... not that much really. Plus you can get by the ticket stub requirements that most theaters have to live up to. The record of the read tickets and the record of the printed tickets is all you need. That with a head count is all the verification in the world anyone would ever need.

Ciao baby

dave

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Mike Blakesley
Film God

Posts: 12492
From: Forsyth, Montana
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 11-15-2004 06:18 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Frank Angel
For verification, the checker would have to come in and confiscate the computer hard-drive.

If you will look at your current contracts, you'll find that they have the right to do just that.

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Frank Angel
Film God

Posts: 5200
From: Brooklyn NY USA
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 11-15-2004 08:57 PM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"For verification, the checker would have to come in and confiscate the computer hard-drive."
quote: Mike Blakesley
If you will look at your current contracts, you'll find that they have the right to do just that.
Nazi bastards

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