Film-Tech Cinema Systems
Film-Tech Forum


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile | my password | register | search | faq & rules | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » Film Handlers' Movie Reviews   » Sunshine State

   
Author Topic: Sunshine State
Leo Enticknap
Film God

Posts: 7142
From: Loma Linda, CA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 08-24-2002 03:38 PM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yet another excellent and underrated John Sayles film which sadly doesn't seem to have generated much interest, even among arthouse buffs. Like Lone Star and Limbo, this film takes us into a part of America where Hollywood doesn't go (or at least from an English perspective it seems that way) - in this case a run-down part of the Florida Atlantic seaboard.

The story focuses on an attempt by property developers to buy out residents and small business owners and develop the area as a resort. In reality this is little more than a hook on which to hang an impressionistic view of the lives of a cross-section of the community. This might sound like anodyne soap-opera stuff, but Sayles carries it off so well that 140 minutes seems like little over an hour. The acting is absolutely superb and as usual there's a thought-provoking twist in the ending - a lot more subtle than in Limbo but every bit as effective.

Out of interest, has this film been widely shown in the US?

 |  IP: Logged

Mitchell Cope
Master Film Handler

Posts: 256
From: Overland Park, KS, United States
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 08-25-2002 10:00 PM      Profile for Mitchell Cope   Email Mitchell Cope   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It ran for at least 3 weeks here in Kansas City at an art house (The Rio). It wasn't my favorite film, but it had some interesting elements. I used to live in Florida, so the Weeki-Wachi connection was sort of neat. Edie Falco gave a really nice performance. I like that scene where she and Timothy Hutton hold noses in the bar.

 |  IP: Logged

Charles Everett
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1470
From: New Jersey
Registered: May 2001


 - posted 09-01-2002 03:08 PM      Profile for Charles Everett   Email Charles Everett   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I got the feeling that this movie was meant to bring out nostalgia for the past -- when men were men, colored people knew their place, etc., etc.

Aside from that Sunshine State had the best photography from a digital source that I've seen so far this year. Film-Techers in Florida might want to know that this was filmed on Amelia Island, north of Jacksonville.

Leo: Sunshine State opened in the US on 6/21 and is still running in Manhattan.

 |  IP: Logged

Leo Enticknap
Film God

Posts: 7142
From: Loma Linda, CA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 09-02-2002 08:06 AM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Spoiler alert: My comments below give away the ending...

quote:
I got the feeling that this movie was meant to bring out nostalgia for the past -- when men were men, colored people knew their place, etc., etc.

It raised those issues, certainly, but I got a sense that Sayles was trying to do more than just evoke nostalgia. On the one hand you had the bossy wife who enthusiastically organised the heritage weekend event, whose husband was so fed up with being hen-pecked that he tried several times (unsuccessfully) to kill himself; but there is also the hotel owner who is terribly unhappy in her leadership role and wants to get out. With coloured people, the point is made that although they may have had to deal with civil rights issues in the past, at least they owned the small businesses on the seafront rather than having to work on the minimum wage for big businesses which take their profits out of the area. I think Sayles was trying to make the point that with evey social or political change there are both positive and negative effects and that nothing is as clear-cut as it first seems, hence the landscaping contractors discovering archeological remains in the penultimate scene and having to abandon their plans for yet another golf course.

Was it really shot on ? I didn't notice any artifacts or pixellation at all. The technique has obviously got better since Oh, Brother, Where Art Thou?, in which you could spot it from a mile off.


 |  IP: Logged



All times are Central (GMT -6:00)  
Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic    next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:



Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.1.2

The Film-Tech Forums are designed for various members related to the cinema industry to express their opinions, viewpoints and testimonials on various products, services and events based upon speculation, personal knowledge and factual information through use, therefore all views represented here allow no liability upon the publishers of this web site and the owners of said views assume no liability for any ill will resulting from these postings. The posts made here are for educational as well as entertainment purposes and as such anyone viewing this portion of the website must accept these views as statements of the author of that opinion and agrees to release the authors from any and all liability.

© 1999-2018 Film-Tech Cinema Systems, LLC. All rights reserved.