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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Digital Cinema Forum   » Can I control 2000s with vnc? (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Can I control 2000s with vnc?
Raz Tovy
Film Handler

Posts: 34
From: haifa, israel ,israel
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted 06-25-2015 02:42 AM      Profile for Raz Tovy   Email Raz Tovy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi,
I have Christie 2000s.
Can I control 2000s with vnc or bowser?
With my 2000zx i control it with bowser.
Tnx all.

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Steve Guttag
We forgot the crackers Gromit!!!

Posts: 12027
From: Annapolis, MD
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 06-25-2015 05:49 AM      Profile for Steve Guttag   Email Steve Guttag   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yes, the CP2000 can be controlled via VNC...however, your TPC has to be on a suitable version (I don't recall which version allowed it but there is no harm in updating to 2.9c...there is a 2.9d but I've yet to see the benefit of it and its package is not like other versions so I've avoided it).

You do have to turn VNC on EACH TIME the TPC is rebooted in order to use VNC. Issue the command (VNC1) to port 5000 and that will turn vnc on. Again, on each power cycle, it will have to be turned on again. There isn't any password for the VNC so there is that.

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Raz Tovy
Film Handler

Posts: 34
From: haifa, israel ,israel
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted 06-25-2015 06:26 AM      Profile for Raz Tovy   Email Raz Tovy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi Steve , Thank you for answer.
How I turned on the vnc server?
How I send VNC1? Do i need a software?

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Steve Guttag
We forgot the crackers Gromit!!!

Posts: 12027
From: Annapolis, MD
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 06-25-2015 11:01 AM      Profile for Steve Guttag   Email Steve Guttag   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I typically use PuTTY...it is a freeware program. Set the Port to 5000 and the IP to the IP of the touchpanel (not the DLP). Merely type (VNC1) <cr>

That will turn it on. You can then use your favorite VNC program to log into the TP (at its address).

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Raz Tovy
Film Handler

Posts: 34
From: haifa, israel ,israel
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted 06-28-2015 12:49 AM      Profile for Raz Tovy   Email Raz Tovy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi,
I tried and I can`t get in.
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I'm stuck in connecting...

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Marcel Birgelen
Film God

Posts: 2424
From: Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands
Registered: Feb 2012


 - posted 06-28-2015 03:59 AM      Profile for Marcel Birgelen   Email Marcel Birgelen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Why is your projector on public IP addresses?

From where are you connecting? The same subnet?

Are you able to ping the projector's IP adresses?

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Raz Tovy
Film Handler

Posts: 34
From: haifa, israel ,israel
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted 06-28-2015 04:48 AM      Profile for Raz Tovy   Email Raz Tovy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I am connected to the same network with my computer, with the same subnet.
I am able to ping to the addresses.

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Greg Routenburg
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 141
From: Toronto, ON, Canada
Registered: May 2003


 - posted 06-28-2015 06:26 AM      Profile for Greg Routenburg   Email Greg Routenburg   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
You're trying to connect with VNC on the wrong port.

You use port 5000 with putty to enable VNC.

You use the default VNC port to connect with VNC. It's port 5800 if I'm not mistaken. I just leave my VNC viewer set to the default and it works like a charm for me.

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Raz Tovy
Film Handler

Posts: 34
From: haifa, israel ,israel
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted 06-28-2015 08:17 AM      Profile for Raz Tovy   Email Raz Tovy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi Greg,
The default port is 5900.
Unfortunately it also does not help and i get:
"Failed to connect to server !"

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Greg Routenburg
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 141
From: Toronto, ON, Canada
Registered: May 2003


 - posted 06-28-2015 10:24 AM      Profile for Greg Routenburg   Email Greg Routenburg   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Make sure you have encryption disabled or it won't connect.

I also found that not all VNC viewers like to play nice with the CP2000. The one that I found to be most stable was RealVNC viewer. You can leave the encryption setting to "Let VNC Server Choose" and it works.

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Steve Guttag
We forgot the crackers Gromit!!!

Posts: 12027
From: Annapolis, MD
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 06-28-2015 10:44 AM      Profile for Steve Guttag   Email Steve Guttag   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It is definitely port 5900 to use for VNC (since there is just the one display).

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Again check your TPC version number...I'm pretty sure there is a minimum version level for VNC. I recommend 2.9c as being VERY stable.

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Try using TightVNC...I KNOW it works with the CP2000.

The point about your complex using PUBLIC IPs is a valid one. Internal IPs should be "private" IPs. That is, if you are going to use a class c IP scheme...they should be all of the from 192.168.x.x

192.117.x.x is a public ip (probably exists out on the internet). Something definitely seems amiss there though this should not be the VNC problem.

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Marco Giustini
Film God

Posts: 2536
From: Reading, UK
Registered: Nov 2007


 - posted 06-28-2015 11:11 AM      Profile for Marco Giustini   Email Marco Giustini   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
What Steve said: it does not work with UltraVNC - there may be a setting for it but I don't know, just use tightvnc.

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Greg Routenburg
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 141
From: Toronto, ON, Canada
Registered: May 2003


 - posted 06-28-2015 12:11 PM      Profile for Greg Routenburg   Email Greg Routenburg   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If he can ping and establish connectivity with putty then regardless of his network scheme, it should work. We can't assume what his company has done with their corporate network. We're only seeing a very small part of the picture here. It is unusual though Steve, you're right.

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Dave Macaulay
Film God

Posts: 2045
From: Toronto, Canada
Registered: Apr 2001


 - posted 06-28-2015 01:07 PM      Profile for Dave Macaulay   Email Dave Macaulay   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It is definitely advisable to NOT use "public" routable addresses for a local intranet like the projection system network. It won't cause a problem if there's no internet connectivity but still a bad idea as some future requirement might add an internet connection. The projection systems will probably stop working if that happens.
If you have a facility local network and an IT policy mandating that all network devices be on it, the site firewall should be configured to block outside access to the projection devices. Off-site access should only be through a VPN. Allowing connections from the system, ie for NTP, is reasonably safe.
I've come across lots of people who think the entire 192.x.x.x space is reserved for local networks: it is not, only 192.168.x.x.
The 172.x.x.x is similar: only 172.16.x.x - 172.31.x.x is reserved.
The entire 10.x.x.x subnet IS reserved if you really need more than the 1 million+ hosts that 172 allows (up to a full class A address space with 16,777,214 usable addresses).
I usually set up the projection devices on a /24 class C network inside the 10.x.x.x reserved space. Some multiplexes need a /23 network to allow a sensible addressing scheme where each device address has a simple correspondence to screen number.

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Steve Guttag
We forgot the crackers Gromit!!!

Posts: 12027
From: Annapolis, MD
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 06-28-2015 03:15 PM      Profile for Steve Guttag   Email Steve Guttag   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I think, in theory you might get away using public IPs behind a router unless you end up trying to access a site using that IP subnet. A router inherently does a NAT translation and presents "you" as its WAN IP on up the chain until you actually hit the internet. Hence, if you use the "Whats My IP" you don't see your private IP, you see the public IP of the device that is actually on the internet. Certainly, it is very bad practice.

As for IP ranges, it all depends on the screen count and devices per screen, naturally. While I typically service low-screen count theatres, my IP allotment is typically pretty high per screen. By the time you allow for all of the traditional DCinema stuff, add in A/V equipment, DSP on the sound, maybe scaler, controllers...etc. It all adds up. Even typical DCinema systems are needing more IPs than some system original planned on. ADA devices now will consume one, some booth monitors now have one and who knows what else will be coming that might need one here or there (and multiply that by screen count).

One beauty of the Dolby IP scheme was that you had a near limitless IP range. Each auditorium got its own 128 device range (even more than my complex systems have ever needed!). However a key to it was that each server had an internal router to allow one on a Theatre Network to "see" the individual auditorium networks. One also had to set up a routing table to your computer knew what gateway (server) to use to get there.

I do think any well designed IP scheme for cinemas should have the screen number in the IP address somewhere. If a tech sees the IP address of the projector, server in one screen within the complex, it should be pretty short order to figure out the rest of the complex.

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