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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Digital Cinema Forum   » The importance of encrypting EVERYTHING (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: The importance of encrypting EVERYTHING
Brad Miller
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Posts: 17687
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 11-05-2013 01:43 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
While this is generally an open letter to all studios, I'm just curious if anyone on the forums can come up with an actual reason WHY the studios seem to think they need to encrypt everything.

First there are trailers. Really? Big deal. I can "sort of" see why they might do that for that one big event movie trailer of the year like Star Wars, but at the end of the day why not just remember that trailers are after all advertising for their product, and the more people that see them the better chance they have of making more millions!

Even if they DID encrypt that one trailer a year, once the big "release date" has passed for said trailer, why are they not issuing that same content unencrypted?

For you studios, I can assure you that there are LOTS of theaters that stick their middle finger up at you and just don't play your silly encrypted trailer. You may THINK everyone is, and sure lots of people do, but you would be wrong to think that everyone loads the keys and rushes to play your trailer with the additional hassle you are pushing onto them.

So that's one unnecessary annoyance, but it isn't the REAL reason why I started this discussion. Yes I'm talking about content that is already on video!!!

So the fact remains, it doesn't matter if you are renting Django Unchained from last year or Rocky Horror Picture Show from 38 years ago...the content is arriving encrypted.

You...studio heads...just what exactly do you think you are protecting? Do you not realize that almost everyone with digital systems has or can connect a bluray player up to their system and just run the silly bluray? Are you not aware that some theaters even run the bluray about a minute behind the DCP just in case something should go wrong with the server? Do you not realize when there is a problem generating keys for a repertory show that the theaters just run the bluray anyway?

YOU AREN'T STOPPING ANYTHING! THERE ISN'T ANYTHING TO PROTECT!

Back in the pre-digital days when the only way to run a repertory movie was to get a 35mm print, it made sense to be super paranoid about 35mm copies getting out into private hands, because at that point a theater owner with no ethics *could* run that print and not report the show. However you guys, yes you the studios, pushed for digital and now theaters can play anything on dvd or bluray with zero effort. There is no longer a reason to keep the same mindset, because it accomplishes nothing.

The content is already within everyone's grasp for $20 (or less) from amazon or Wal-Mart. Any theater owner that is going to mis-report (or fail to report) a repertory show is going to do it regardless of any encryption you put on the content...and no pirate is going to run and copy a DCP to put an old movie onto the internet.

Seriously. Could everyone maybe just wake up for a minute?

So what the studios are doing is creating MORE WORK. Wait, let me clarify. More UNNECESSARY work for everyone in the chain.

Oh sure the keymakers at Deluxe and Technicolor probably just LOVE it when you send them more keys to make, since they are getting paid for an unnessary amount of keys (an entirely different discussion).

So you are wasting the theater's time in having to load and validate keys for content readily available to the home market.

You are spending unnecessary money to "encrypt" content that freeware such as MakeMKV will do for free.

You are overloading the keymaker's systems, frequently making it so when we need REAL keys for first run stuff, it is "in the queue".

You are potentially going to overload the keystore in DCP playback servers, meaning your foolish antics in encrypting trailers, old content on bluray and 50 different versions of the same movie can actually CAUSE theaters to lose shows because the keystore is full and won't accept that new key for the big Hunger Games show on opening day.

And finally you are wasting your OWN money in having to pay the fee to have these keys generated.

Seriously...wake up. Once content is released on bluray its out there and there is NOTHING to protect. At that point the encrypted masters should just be tossed for unencrypted versions. What do you REALLY think you are preventing?

Somebody please explain this "logic" to me.

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Antonio Casado
Film Handler

Posts: 36
From: Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Registered: Apr 2013


 - posted 11-05-2013 03:03 PM      Profile for Antonio Casado   Author's Homepage   Email Antonio Casado   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
There is no logic in that, you are right.

In fact, you can COPY a Encrypted DCP. You cannot play it, but hey, send it to your favourite hacker, and hop!, let´s see :-)

And about new releases...wait three or four months and you get the Bluray. Remux it and hop, there is the content free of charge for all in Internet.

Waste of time...

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John Roddy
Expert Film Handler

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From: Spring, TX, United States
Registered: Dec 2012


 - posted 11-05-2013 03:33 PM      Profile for John Roddy   Author's Homepage   Email John Roddy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Because the studios want control. If they lock their content, they can tell you exactly when you can and can't play it, and how you are allowed to use it. That doesn't necessarily mean they get that control, but it gives them the feeling that they at least did something, and I guess that's good enough for them. It's the same reason they encrypt the hell out of DVDs and blu-ray discs. There is a ton of software you can download right now to completely kill any and all of that protection on those, and it's been that way for years. Yet, they still encrypt everything (don't forget region-locking!).

At this point, I'm convinced that they just have a habit of locking down everything they can. Yeah, they could change that, but I'm sure we're all familiar with how well the entertainment industry reacts to change.

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Ron Curran
Master Film Handler

Posts: 499
From: Springwood NSW Australia
Registered: Feb 2006


 - posted 11-05-2013 05:54 PM      Profile for Ron Curran   Author's Homepage   Email Ron Curran   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The rights to one rep title were changed after our booking was confirmed. We received the DCP from the previous exhibitor. The new rights holder could not issue a key. It took many international calls before a key was received hours before the first screening.

This title had play-in and intermission so the first screening was not a happy presentation.

You can understand that our patrons were confused by "to be confirmed" notices, then a little cheated by a not-quite-perfect presentation.

Why does this have to happen?

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Scott Norwood
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From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
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 - posted 11-05-2013 06:11 PM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
They probably still think that CSS is an effective anti-piracy measure and that HDCP is secure. Given these (incorrect) assumptions, it makes sense not to provide unencrypted digital "content" to the world.

In short, the people who make these decisions are just out of touch with reality.

Who is sending out encrypted trailers?

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Edward Havens
Jedi Master Film Handler

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From: Los Angeles, CA
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 - posted 11-06-2013 07:54 AM      Profile for Edward Havens   Email Edward Havens   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
All IMAX trailers need their own individual KDMs, Scott.

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Ken Lackner
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From: Atlanta, GA, USA
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 - posted 11-06-2013 09:10 AM      Profile for Ken Lackner   Email Ken Lackner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Brad wasn't even talking about IMAX trailers. I remember the trailer for Dark Knight Rises (not IMAX) was encrypted. I'm sure there have been others since.

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Aaron Garman
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From: Notre Dame du Lac, Indiana USA
Registered: Mar 2003


 - posted 11-06-2013 12:33 PM      Profile for Aaron Garman   Email Aaron Garman   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
They probably just feel as if they're doing their part to combat piracy. Trouble is that it does nothing to combat it, and more than anything fuels more people to figure out how to copy. It's all a waste of time.

In the case of Blu-ray, I wouldn't have to re-purpose things if studios would get rid of dumb menus, pointless ads, and other things that make watching a film on the format a pain in the ass. There was talk once of a Dolby type server for Blu-ray consumption. I'd love something like that so I could just load a disc, select the film with proper audio, queue it up, and hit play. No menus. No ads. Just pure cinema.

MakeMKV and tsmuxer are life savers.

AJG

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Marcel Birgelen
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From: Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands
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 - posted 11-06-2013 04:54 PM      Profile for Marcel Birgelen   Email Marcel Birgelen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Brad Miller
Somebody please explain this "logic" to me.
I've dealt with "content owners", including studios in the past regarding licensing for a VOD service. It was in the days just before the Netflix Online Streaming Service and VOD via IP became common.

Every studio wanted DRM on everything. No matter how old the stuff was, no matter that the content was essentially free for all via bittorent et all and easily ripped from the DVD.

To make matters worse, every studio wanted another kind of DRM. No piece of hardware/software combination that was even remotely affordable would be able to support all those different flavors of DRM.

Distributing encrypted trailers, is just brain dead. Even if it is this long-awaited Star Wars XXVII bullshit teaser trailer. As you told you yourself, a trailer is just advertising. Any form of encryption is just counter-productive for everybody involved.

But I do understand why they encrypt DCPs of even repertoire titles. DCPs are considered a premium format, the closest thing to the digital master you can get right now. Some DCPs might even be in 4K and there is no mainstream distribution of 4K content yet.

Studios want to sell you all your existing content at 4K, once that goes mainstream. So they will do almost anything to prevent those "premium formats" to leak out into the wild.

quote: Scott Norwood
They probably still think that CSS is an effective anti-piracy measure and that HDCP is secure. Given these (incorrect) assumptions, it makes sense not to provide unencrypted digital "content" to the world.

In short, the people who make these decisions are just out of touch with reality.

Out of touch? They seem to live in some kind of parallel universe, that just sometimes happen to intersect with ours and only if they open the portal from their side... That is also how they would like to deliver their precious content to us.

This is how MPAA supposes you should copy DVD content. Because, using any kind of CSS circumvention technique is actually against the law in the US.

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Martin McCaffery
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From: Montgomery, AL
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 - posted 11-06-2013 06:41 PM      Profile for Martin McCaffery   Author's Homepage   Email Martin McCaffery   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I think you're all over thinking it. It's just easier in a giant corporation to have one rule - encrypt everything - than to have to make a decision and pass it through the system for every film and every trailer. It doesn't cost them anything. All the work and inconvenience is passed on to the user, who is not in a position to do anything about it.

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Brad Miller
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From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 11-06-2013 09:42 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Martin McCaffery
It doesn't cost them anything.
Yes it does. They have to pay for every KDM that is made.

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Martin McCaffery
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From: Montgomery, AL
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 - posted 11-07-2013 09:11 AM      Profile for Martin McCaffery   Author's Homepage   Email Martin McCaffery   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I'll concede I know nothing about what it takes to issue a KDM, but is it more than a rounding error on a multi-million dollar movie? Or more than it would cost to have a staff deciding and verifying which films will and which won't be encrypted? I'm still coming down on the side of bureaucratic inertia on this one, which a side dish of power control.

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Carsten Kurz
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 - posted 11-07-2013 10:36 AM      Profile for Carsten Kurz   Email Carsten Kurz   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well, quite certainly it costs them money to create a new unencrypted DCP from a DCDM after three months of regular encrypted booking.
So why should they do it, they will rather use the existing encrypted version for repertoire bookings as well.

Trailer encryption, stupid.

- Carsten

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Brad Miller
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From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
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 - posted 11-07-2013 12:22 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
That's the problem though, many of these repertory re-issues are NOT the original DCP that was ran during the theatrical engagement. They are re-masters at LOWER BITRATES!

They are already re-mastering it. What's the big flippin' deal to just make it unencrypted so KDMs are a non-issue for content readily available to any would-be-pirate anyway?

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Scott Norwood
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From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
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 - posted 11-07-2013 01:24 PM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
They are re-masters at LOWER BITRATES!
Really? WTF? Why would the distributors go to the trouble and expense of re-creating something that had already been created, but then do it worse the second time? Especially when that is the version that may be held to be the "definitive" version of the "content" (not "film") for many years into the future?

Every time I think that content (not "film") distributors cannot be any more stupid than they already are, I hear about something like this.

With film, the director needs to approve of an answer print and a check print off of an IN. I assume that he now approves of the DCP used in the initial release as well. Does the director get to approve (or even see) the "crappy DCP" version, too?

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