Film-Tech Cinema Systems
Film-Tech Forum


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile | my password | register | search | faq & rules | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Digital Cinema Forum   » Assisted Listening Devices (Page 1)

 
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Author Topic: Assisted Listening Devices
Ronda Fitzsimmons
Film Handler

Posts: 69
From: Pottstown, PA, USA
Registered: Sep 2002


 - posted 07-24-2013 04:35 PM      Profile for Ronda Fitzsimmons   Author's Homepage   Email Ronda Fitzsimmons   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Any recommendations for something that will work simply and cheaply with both Dolby CP750 and Ultra Stereo JSD-60D?

 |  IP: Logged

Justin Hamaker
Film God

Posts: 2095
From: Lakeport, CA USA
Registered: Jan 2004


 - posted 07-24-2013 04:46 PM      Profile for Justin Hamaker   Author's Homepage   Email Justin Hamaker   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We just installed an Ultra-Stereo system. We have CP750's in all of our auditoriums. The units give us assisted listening AND descriptive audio. The signal is transmitted by infrared to the headphones, so there is no need to select an auditorium. Also, it is very easy to add on closed captioning devices.

While we do not have JSD-60's at our cinema, I have to assume they would work just fine since both are from USL.

One point I would make it to not go cheap on the accessibility devices. You want something that will work reliably, and be appealing to customers. Also keep in mind that having working accessibility devices are a defense against an expensive ADA lawsuit. Although it is not law yet, it is likely that closed captioning and descriptive audio may be added to the ADA. Buying a system capable of both would be a prudent investment.

Prior to installing the USL system, we used an old Phonic Ear system. The customers would get headphones plugged into a receiver - similar in size to an iPod. The problem is we had to rely on the employee to ensure the device was set on the right auditorium. Plus, these devices were not very sturdy and burned through batteries pretty quick.

 |  IP: Logged

Justin Hamaker
Film God

Posts: 2095
From: Lakeport, CA USA
Registered: Jan 2004


 - posted 07-24-2013 08:05 PM      Profile for Justin Hamaker   Author's Homepage   Email Justin Hamaker   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thinking about this a little further, if you wanted to do this in an inexpensive way, you could get an off-the-shelf FM transmitter and a handful of transistor radios.

0.5W CZH-05B Long Range (10km) Dual Mode Stereo Broadcast Home FM Transmitter*Fashion Black*

We just purchased one of the units above to try out at our drive-in. It actually had very good range (about 1000 feet) and puts out a very good clean signal with just the little stick antenna it comes with. It would easily have enough range to cover an indoor auditorium.

Then use something like the radio lined below for the actual listening unit. This would give you a workable system for under $100.
Sony SRF-59SILVER (SRF59) Portable AM/FM Walkman Radio

The problem is you have to have a different transmitter for every auditorium, and a second for each auditorium if you want to do descriptive audio. This solution also would not provide you with the ability to do closed captioning.

 |  IP: Logged

Harold Hallikainen
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 721
From: Denver, CO, USA
Registered: Aug 2009


 - posted 07-24-2013 10:54 PM      Profile for Harold Hallikainen   Author's Homepage   Email Harold Hallikainen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I doubt that FM transmitter is legal to use in the US. 500mW is way too much power with any antenna. Field strength limits for unlicensed transmitters on the FM band are
. here.

These transmitters are also supposed to be certificated by the FCC and have an FCC ID. web page

Harold

 |  IP: Logged

Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17662
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 07-24-2013 11:28 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
As long as they have an FM transmitter that complies with Part 15 rules like this one, then they should be fine since there is nothing the FCC could do about it. (Plus it could be in stereo.)

 |  IP: Logged

Monte L Fullmer
Film God

Posts: 8290
From: Nampa, Idaho, USA
Registered: Nov 2004


 - posted 07-25-2013 01:28 AM      Profile for Monte L Fullmer   Email Monte L Fullmer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
SONY has a system that connect to any processor that broadcasts audio (and for the visual impaired from the server) close captioning via WiFi.

You program the receiver to the auditorium for either or both closed captioning and audio prior to the issue to the patron.

It's quite the blessing for those of hard of hearing or visual impaired.

-Monte

 |  IP: Logged

Harold Hallikainen
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 721
From: Denver, CO, USA
Registered: Aug 2009


 - posted 07-25-2013 07:15 AM      Profile for Harold Hallikainen   Author's Homepage   Email Harold Hallikainen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Speaking of the Sony system, USL makes a cup holder mount closed caption receiver that works with the Sony transmitter. It is the CCR-200.

Harold

 |  IP: Logged

Ken Lackner
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1875
From: Atlanta, GA, USA
Registered: Sep 2001


 - posted 07-26-2013 12:10 PM      Profile for Ken Lackner   Email Ken Lackner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Monte L Fullmer
SONY has a system that connect to any processor that broadcasts audio (and for the visual impaired from the server) close captioning via WiFi.
Not exactly. While the system does operate in the same 2.4GHz band that WiFi operates in (and therefore susceptible to potential interference from nearby WiFi networks), it does not use WiFi protocols. It's not like the transmitters are access points.

quote: Monte L Fullmer
You program the receiver to the auditorium for either or both closed captioning and audio prior to the issue to the patron.
Also not quite true. When closed caption glasses are connected to the receiver, the audio port (which is a standard 3.5mm headphone jack) is disabled. So you cannot use audio and captioning simultaneously.

 |  IP: Logged

Louis Bornwasser
Film God

Posts: 4426
From: prospect ky usa
Registered: Mar 2005


 - posted 07-26-2013 12:28 PM      Profile for Louis Bornwasser   Author's Homepage   Email Louis Bornwasser   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Expectation. In the US we expect to use a system that is IR. No tuning is required between rooms, since the walls stop all light. The Ultra Stereo is a good system that is reliable; certainly more than most.

In other countries, there is in place a loop system which is superior because most hearing aids come equipped with an on board loop receiver. You don't have to loan out anything. and there is little or no bleed over room to room.

Other systems work perfect;y well, but they violate the rule of expectations and require training the customer every time.

Another problem is that most hearing impaired customers are vain enough NOT to ask for the loan of equipment that, to them, is also unsanitary. They literally suffer in solence.

 |  IP: Logged

Gordon McLeod
Film God

Posts: 9442
From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 07-26-2013 12:58 PM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
One issue with IR emiters is interferance from LED and CFL lamps
In several locations we have had to use the Senhieser Green LED emiters

 |  IP: Logged

Sam D. Chavez
Film God

Posts: 2073
From: Martinez, CA USA
Registered: Aug 2003


 - posted 07-26-2013 01:41 PM      Profile for Sam D. Chavez   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Regards USL, the interference from lights is gone as of the introduction of the Model UPC 28 that does not operate on the 95 Khz band.

 |  IP: Logged

Harold Hallikainen
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 721
From: Denver, CO, USA
Registered: Aug 2009


 - posted 07-26-2013 02:58 PM      Profile for Harold Hallikainen   Author's Homepage   Email Harold Hallikainen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Does anyone have experience with loops? All receivers are required to have a 3.5mm jack to drive neck loops, which provide an AC magnetic field, the same as a room loop. These work with hearing aids that have telecoils that are designed to pick up the stray AC magnetic field from telephone earphones. However, many hearing aids have an automatic T-coil switch. These detect the DC magnetic field from the permanent magnet in the telephone earpiece to enable the T-coil. Neck and room loops do not generate this DC field, so the hearing aid does not enable the T-coil.

You can place the HI headphones over the hearing aid to get both the DC and AC fields from the headphones, so the T-coils work.

More discussion of this is here.

I would like to hear anyone's experiences with loops.

Thanks!

Harold

 |  IP: Logged

Louis Bornwasser
Film God

Posts: 4426
From: prospect ky usa
Registered: Mar 2005


 - posted 07-26-2013 03:58 PM      Profile for Louis Bornwasser   Author's Homepage   Email Louis Bornwasser   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Contact Max Bell at Bell Theatre Services, London. He is my source on that technology; mandated by their National Health people.

Basically a large loop of #10 wire driven by a very low impedance audio amplifier, or so I am told. Louis

 |  IP: Logged

Gordon McLeod
Film God

Posts: 9442
From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 07-27-2013 01:40 PM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If they changed the frequency does it require different headsets?
When i used the green ones we got cited by the canadian equivelent of ADA as standard IR hearing aids didnt work

 |  IP: Logged

Sam D. Chavez
Film God

Posts: 2073
From: Martinez, CA USA
Registered: Aug 2003


 - posted 07-27-2013 02:57 PM      Profile for Sam D. Chavez   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The UPC 28's require new headsets. They are on dual 2.3/2.5 Ghz so it's ready for visual narration.

 |  IP: Logged



All times are Central (GMT -6:00)
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic    next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:



Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.1.2

The Film-Tech Forums are designed for various members related to the cinema industry to express their opinions, viewpoints and testimonials on various products, services and events based upon speculation, personal knowledge and factual information through use, therefore all views represented here allow no liability upon the publishers of this web site and the owners of said views assume no liability for any ill will resulting from these postings. The posts made here are for educational as well as entertainment purposes and as such anyone viewing this portion of the website must accept these views as statements of the author of that opinion and agrees to release the authors from any and all liability.

© 1999-2018 Film-Tech Cinema Systems, LLC. All rights reserved.