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Author Topic: 3D Question
Andy Linde
Film Handler

Posts: 19
From: Nelson, New Zealand
Registered: Mar 2010


 - posted 04-11-2010 07:47 PM      Profile for Andy Linde   Author's Homepage   Email Andy Linde   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We use a Christie CP2000-M with Real D 3D and I've noticed that in some trailers and features there is a grayish vertical band (only visible through one eye) on either the left side of the screen. They vary in width depending on the shot. For example picture could be perfect in one shot, then the camera angle changes and there is a fairly large grey stripe on the left side only visible through the right eye. Sometimes you can see the stripes changing width during the shot too.

I found this really annoyed me while watching the Alice in Wonderland feature! So is it something to do with the way they make 3D films? Is it a Real D thing? Its as if the left and right eye images are slightly different aspects.

I didn't pick it up at all during Avatar, but definitely during Alice, and a few current trailers including Shrek the Fourth. [Confused]

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Richard Fowler
Film God

Posts: 2389
From: Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA
Registered: Jun 2001


 - posted 04-12-2010 07:36 AM      Profile for Richard Fowler   Email Richard Fowler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Common on 3D that is generated from 2D source material....only so much to work with for layering and image shift.

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Andy Linde
Film Handler

Posts: 19
From: Nelson, New Zealand
Registered: Mar 2010


 - posted 04-12-2010 08:55 AM      Profile for Andy Linde   Author's Homepage   Email Andy Linde   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
But Alice was filmed specifically for 3D? You'll notice that the 'real life' part of the film before she falls down the rabbit hole is fine, but as soon as she falls in the stripes start appearing. Possibly happens with computer rendering? Although then you think you would notice it in films like Avatar which were largely computer modeled. Have been searching all over the internet for any other mentions of this but have returned no results. Would really love an explanation to put my mind at rest.

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Pietro Clarici
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 136
From: Foligno (PG) Italy
Registered: Sep 2008


 - posted 04-12-2010 09:46 AM      Profile for Pietro Clarici   Author's Homepage   Email Pietro Clarici   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It's called "floating window", and it's intentional: http://digitalcinema.disney.com/dc3dFloatWinMov.aspx

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Mike Blakesley
Film God

Posts: 12502
From: Forsyth, Montana
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 04-12-2010 02:22 PM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Alice was originally shot in 2-D and was "converted" to 3_D after filming but certain shots and elements were "planned" for 3-D. Whereas Titans was planned and shot as a 2-D film and was only converted to 3-D when the executives saw dollar signs.

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Jonathan Althaus
Master Film Handler

Posts: 435
From: Bedford, TX
Registered: Dec 2008


 - posted 04-12-2010 04:35 PM      Profile for Jonathan Althaus   Email Jonathan Althaus   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I've heard these referred to as "floating frames" and Disney is apparently huge on these. xmas carol and alice were very noticeable, but I didn't notice them in avatar or clash.

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Andy Linde
Film Handler

Posts: 19
From: Nelson, New Zealand
Registered: Mar 2010


 - posted 04-12-2010 06:57 PM      Profile for Andy Linde   Author's Homepage   Email Andy Linde   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yes, floating windows. It makes sense, and Disney IS huge on them! Honestly, they just distract me from the film [Frown]

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Adrian Hauser
Film Handler

Posts: 44
From: Sydney
Registered: Mar 2008


 - posted 06-09-2010 06:31 PM      Profile for Adrian Hauser   Author's Homepage   Email Adrian Hauser   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Floating windows help with 3D Screen violations.
If part of the image is to be projected "infront" of the screen it only technically works if
that object is constrained within the screen edges. If it for some reason goes over the screen edge the 3D effect is broken. This can be marginally fixed by adding a floating window that perceptually moves the screen plane forward to the same convergence point of that object.
When finishing a film the last part is to do a pass where you try to direct where the eye will sit comfortably across cut points without having to make the viewer refocus each time on a new depth. This inherently means you have to violate some of the 3d rules and make Foreground objects break the screen edge. To fix these violations Floating Windows are incorporated to lessen the nauseating effect.

Adrian
Some more info on 3D post here.

www.iris-digital.org/wordpress

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