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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Digital Cinema Forum   » "Titan A.E" sent by Internet to theater (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: "Titan A.E" sent by Internet to theater
John Walsh
Film God

Posts: 2490
From: Connecticut, USA, Earth, Milky Way
Registered: Oct 1999


 - posted 06-06-2000 08:20 AM      Profile for John Walsh   Email John Walsh   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Saw this on the AltaVista news site:

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Movie history will be made on Tuesday when 20th Century Fox premieres the first movie to be beamed over the Internet from a Hollywood studio to a theater across the country without ever touching film, Fox officials said on Monday.

The animated sci-fi epic ``Titan A.E.'' will be digitally projected to an audience at the
Supercomm trade show in Atlanta after it has been sent from Burbank, California, over a secure Internet-based network developed by Cisco Systems Inc., the world's biggest maker of Internet equipment. The event will showcase a technology that could one day replace a movie distribution system that dates to the birth of the modern motion picture industry, about 80 years ago.

But with issues of cost and copyright protection yet to be addressed, Internet transmission of movies from studios to exhibitors is years away from becoming commonplace, officials at Fox and Cisco acknowledged on Monday. ``It's a small step toward looking at the future,'' said Tom Sherak, chairman of the Fox domestic film group. ``To me, it's like being at the World's Fair in 1964.''

Not cheap

The digital projector alone costs about $100,000, not to mention the added price of a
special screen, sound system and computer equipment needed to download and show ``Titan A.E.'' in digital format. Technically, speaking, however, ``What we're showcasing tomorrow is available now,'' Cisco spokeswoman Erica Schroeder said. ``It's all the business issues now that have to be resolved.''

A number of films, notably ``Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace'' and Disney's ``Dinosaur,'' have been digitally projected by a handful of theaters since last
year. But the Atlanta screening of ``Titan A.E'' marks the first time a studio has distributed its movie to a theater audience via the Internet.

Official premiere in normal theater

``Titan A.E.,'' which mixes traditional cell animation with computer-generated imagery, gets its official premiere on Saturday in Los Angeles and opens June 16. The movie, set a thousand years in the future, features the voices of Matt Demon and Drew Barrymore as a pair of teenagers on a quest to save mankind after Earth has been destroyed by alien attack. For the Atlanta screening, the 90-minute movie will be projected after it has been downloaded from Burbank rather than shown simultaneously with its transmission over the Internet. ''Real-time'' projection is effectively prevented by the sheer size of the computer file containing the movie -- 50 gigabytes, which is roughly 20,000 times larger than a typical MP3 music file, Schroeder said. Even though it will be transmitted at speeds 800 times faster than a standard analog modem connection, it will take about four hours for the movie to be downloaded in Atlanta, she said.

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Gordon McLeod
Film God

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From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 06-06-2000 08:50 AM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Iether it will take forever to deliver ahead of time or will have to be very compressed

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Ken Layton
Phenomenal Film Handler

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From: Olympia, Wash. USA
Registered: Sep 1999


 - posted 06-06-2000 09:41 AM      Profile for Ken Layton   Email Ken Layton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Four hours?! What happens if there's a glitch and you have to hit "refresh"? What if there's server problems?

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John Walsh
Film God

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From: Connecticut, USA, Earth, Milky Way
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 - posted 06-06-2000 10:41 AM      Profile for John Walsh   Email John Walsh   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yes, that's why they are not showing it in "real-time." Only after the film is completely transmitted and stored onsite will they show it.

Data over communication lines (even over non-internet lines) are broken up and sent in smaller chunks (called "blocks" or "frames.") The next chunk is not sent until the previous one is received OK. If there's a problem, it sort of automatically hits it's own "refresh" button, and only resends the bad chunk, rather than the whole thing. Actually, if you don't mind waiting, the internet is very reliable. It even continued worked quite well for Iraq while we were bombing the daylights out of them.

Even though it takes 4 hours to send, they will probably start sending the film a day or so ahead just in case. If there's problems, they can fallback to the "Fedex overnight" data transmission method....!

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Gordon McLeod
Film God

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From: Toronto Ontario Canada
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 - posted 06-06-2000 10:51 AM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
maybe they should get a technicolour internet connection


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Ken Layton
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1452
From: Olympia, Wash. USA
Registered: Sep 1999


 - posted 06-06-2000 12:43 PM      Profile for Ken Layton   Email Ken Layton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Gee, if it takes 4 hours to load, what would it be like to send it to 3,000 screens (just in the USA).

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Dave Williams
Wet nipple scene

Posts: 1836
From: Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 06-06-2000 12:53 PM      Profile for Dave Williams   Author's Homepage   Email Dave Williams   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
They talk about it being a "small step" towards the future, however I do recall a "small step" for man in the late sixties that was supposed to get us to a manned space colony on mars by now. I do believe we are still having trouble with a teeny weeny space station orbiting the earth.

I agree, let technicolor handle the "delivery" of DLP product and it will NEVER get off the shelf. I mean that too.

Dave

------------------
"If it's not worth doing, I have allready been there and done it"

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Greg Mueller
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From: Port Gamble, WA
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 - posted 06-06-2000 01:02 PM      Profile for Greg Mueller   Author's Homepage   Email Greg Mueller   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I think animated features will be well suited for the digital system. As they (cartoons) do not have the subtle variations in color and depth that "live" features have, it seems a perfect medium for this system. Seems like a long time to download anything though.


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Mark Lensenmayer
Phenomenal Film Handler

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From: Upper Arlington, OH
Registered: Sep 1999


 - posted 06-06-2000 01:49 PM      Profile for Mark Lensenmayer   Email Mark Lensenmayer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Here is a link to a more detailed release on the Atlanta presentation.
(http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/146/pressroom/2000/jun00/sp_060500b.htm)

As I calculate this out, they are transmitting this at about 27 megabits/sec., which would easily fit into a standard T3 line, which is capable of 44 megabits/sec. It should be no trouble to transmit this over the conventional internet, let alone the mammoth Qwest backbone.

There are some new technologies out there that Qwest is testing with Nortel optical switches that claim 40 GIGAbits/sec. This would transfer a 40 Gigabyte file in about 8 seconds. The release implies that they can use a multiplexer to put 4X the data on one line, coming out to 160 gigabits/sec or 20 gigabytes per second. This technology will be ready to go in early 2001.
(http://www.qwest.com/about/media/story.asp?id=288)


So, it looks like the technology to deliver films to theatres via internet is closer than we thought.

Mark Lensenmayer
(Networking Teacher Guy)


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Tim Reed
Better Projection Pays

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From: Northampton, PA
Registered: Sep 1999


 - posted 06-06-2000 05:12 PM      Profile for Tim Reed   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
So THAT'S why my email was taking so long to d/l the other day!!!

------------------
Better Projection Pays!

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Scott Norwood
Film God

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From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 06-06-2000 06:40 PM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
My reaction to this is: "what a waste of bandwidth!" Gee, let's see...$20 to send a box of DVDs overnight via Fedex vs. $megabucks a month for a T3 to the theatre.

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Ian Price
Phenomenal Film Handler

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From: Denver, CO
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 - posted 06-06-2000 07:14 PM      Profile for Ian Price   Email Ian Price   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If the megabucks are being spent putting T-3 in the theatres, then all the better to access Film-Tech!

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John Pytlak
Film God

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From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
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 - posted 06-07-2000 07:23 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hey, everyone knows transmitting data is free! I keep telling myself that everytime I pay my phone bill, cable bill and ISP bill.
Bandwidth, and the infrastructure to support it, has a pricetag.


------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Eastman Kodak Company
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7419
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com


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John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
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 - posted 06-07-2000 11:21 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
BTW, what is the typical monthly charge for a dedicated T-3 (44.746 megabits per second) line ? (Hopefully not "megabucks"! I've heard somewhere in the vicinity of $15,000 per month.) Are there any price plans based on the amount/transmission time of data transmitted? How available is the service throughout the country, and in each city?

Lower priced T-1 service (approximately $1,900 per month?) would obviously be too slow, taking about 29 times longer to transmit the data (over 100 hours per movie?).

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Eastman Kodak Company
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7419
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com


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Scott Norwood
Film God

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From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 06-07-2000 05:06 PM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Depending on your location, you can get T1 service for about $1600/month. That's for full 1.544Mbps service; amazingly, fractional T1 service is sometimes more expensive.

I haven't priced out T3 service, but consider that a T3 provides 45Mbps speeds, I'd suspect that it would be many times the cost of a T1.

Personally, I want an OC-192 line into my basement, but I doubt that this will happen anytime soon.

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