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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Digital Cinema Forum   » Lucas releasing all six Star Wars movies in 3D in 2007 (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Lucas releasing all six Star Wars movies in 3D in 2007
Mark J. Marshall
Film God

Posts: 3172
From: New Castle, DE, USA
Registered: Aug 2002


 - posted 03-21-2005 01:21 AM      Profile for Mark J. Marshall     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This is strange. I don't pretend to be an expert on this, but apparently there's a process to "convert" 2D to 3D...? How does that work?? [Confused]

Anyway, here's the article link.

And the text:

Five Major Filmmakers Support TI’s Digital 3D Cinema
by Joseph L. Kleiman

March 17, 2005 (Las Vegas) – Today at ShoWest, Texas Instruments DLP Cinema unvield their prototype 3D product. The images were shown on a 48-foot white matte screen, and projected on a Christie CP 2000 DLP Cinema projector with a Dolby surround sound system. Doug Darrow, Business Development Manager for TI DLP Cinema hosted, with filmmakers George Lucas, James Cameron, Robert Zemeckis, Robert Rodriguez and Randall Kleiser in attendance.

George Lucas and James Cameron each introduced a collection clips during the presentation. The first, introduced by Lucas, showcased the 2D to 3D conversion process perfected by In-Three. 2D to 3D conversion clips introduced by Lucas included the speeder chase from “Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones,” Tony Scott’s “Top Gun,” Disney’s “Lilo and Stitch” and the entire first reel of “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.” The 3D conversions were spectacular, but even wearing the streamlined LCD glasses, ghosting occurred. Regardless this minor issue, Lucas feels that this 3D digital conversion actually outshines the original film. According to Lucas, a number of demos have been made to his company over the past 20 years by various companies, but In-Three’s was the first one to meet his standards. Lucas is planning to release his entire Star Wars saga in 3D for the 30th anniversary in 2007.

Lucas has been pushing digital solutions for almost eight years. According to the filmmaker, the more he’s used digital solutions, the more advantages he has encountered and the more possibilities he has discovered. Because 30-40% of films today utilize a digital negative, the preparation of films for digital cinema will be cost efficient. The advantages of a digital presentation are the lack of weave due to sprockets, scratches and tears. Whereas a film print degrades the more it is shown, a digital print retains its pristine condition.

After Lucas, Cameron introduced a selection of clips showcasing how digital 3D projection disregards the way the film was shot. Cameron’s montage consisted of clips from his 3D features “Ghosts of the Abyss” and “Aliens of the Deep,” both filmed with a combination of a 3D digital rig and CGI; Cameron’s “Terminator 2: 3D” from Universal Studios Theme Parks, shot on 5perf/65mm; Robert Rodriguez’ “Spy Kids 3D,” a hybrid of live action and CGI; CGI clips form Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” films (following up Jackson’s appearance in 3D during the Lucas portion of the presentation, where Jackson lends his support to the new technology with his ultimate goal being hobbits in 3D); and Robert Zemeckis’ “The Polar Express,” filmed with performance capture and starring virtual characters. “Ghosts,” “Aliens,” and “Polar” have all been screened in 3D on IMAX screens, but this was the first 3D digital screening of scenes from “Spy Kids” utilizing polarized lenses which allowed for a full-color image and completely impressed its director, Rodriguez.

Cameron noted that we now exist in a production world where all parts of production (filming, post, CGI) are digital, and where, with digital projection, it’s possible for a movie to live its entire existence without seeing a single sprocket. This results in the most perfect 3D image possible. According to Cameron, the specs for 3D projection are outlined in the DCI (Digital Cinema Initiative) specs (this statement contradicts what Charles Swarz of USC’s Entertainment Technology Center stated at an earlier ShoWest presentation). Cameron said that 3D is currently available only in the IMAX format. He wants 3D to be available in every multiplex, pointing out that the IMAX version of “The Polar Express” grossed $45 million, meaning that 35% of the film’s revenue came from only 2% of its screens. By increasing the number of 3D screens available, distributors and exhibitors can drastically increase profit through offering a premium product. Cameron noted logistical issues regarding distribution still need to be overcome, such as whether 3D will be a day-and-date release with its 2D counterpart or if it will be released a few weeks prior. It’s also not certain if theaters will charge a premium price for the 3D product.

Each filmmaker continues his support of IMAX and IMAX 3D. Cameron noted that, to date, only 16 IMAX films have been released in 3D. He believes that by now IMAX should have thousands of 3D releases, but the venues are not there, much like he believes that by now there should be thousands of venues for digital projection. Additionally Cameron asserted that digital cinema will not act as competition to IMAX, but rather compliment it by providing more product for IMAX 3D. Audiences are looking for a premium theater experience, and all five filmmakers feel that, with its larger screen, IMAX provides that experience.

Lucas, Cameron, Zemeckis, Rodriguez and Kleiser embrace this new 3D technology. Kleiser, who directed “Honey, I Shrunk the Audience” for Disney’s theme parks discussed seeing In-Three’s demonstration of 2D to 3D conversion for classic films, including “Gone with the Wind” and his own film “Grease.” As previously mentioned, Lucas is scheduling a 3D conversion of all six Star Wars films for Summer 2007, which Cameron noted would put them up against his own 3D feature, “Battle Angel.” In addition to wanting to convert “From Dusk to Dawn” to 3D, his original desire, Rodriguez has a 3D family film, “Shark Boy and Lava Girl,” scheduled for release this summer, and Zemeckis has two 3D productions in the works. Lucas also mentioned that he wants the fourth Indiana Jones film to be made in 3D, but first must turn Steven Spielberg to the 3D side of The Force.

Article © 2005 Joseph L. Kleiman/Amanda Gardner

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Mike Blakesley
Film God

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From: Forsyth, Montana
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 - posted 03-21-2005 02:58 AM      Profile for Mike Blakesley   Author's Homepage   Email Mike Blakesley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Eh. It was a gimmick before, it'll be a gimmick again.

Beats coming up with new ideas though, I guess. [Roll Eyes]

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John Wilson
Film God

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From: Sydney, Australia.
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 03-21-2005 04:08 AM      Profile for John Wilson   Email John Wilson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
>>Lucas also mentioned that he wants the fourth Indiana Jones film to be made in 3D, but first must turn Steven Spielberg to the 3D side of The Force.<<

Egad... will this guy wake UP for goodness sake? Spielberg will probably slap him hard and tell him the same thing......oh yes, I like the sound of that. [Smile]

>>
The 3D conversions were spectacular, but even wearing the streamlined LCD glasses, ghosting occurred. Regardless this minor issue, Lucas feels that this 3D digital conversion actually outshines the original film.
<<

Well, of course it does Georgie Boy...it is DIGITAL ,after all... why dwell on quality when it can be screened in DIGITAL?

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Adam Martin
I'm not even gonna point out the irony.

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From: Dallas, TX
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 - posted 03-21-2005 04:39 AM      Profile for Adam Martin   Author's Homepage   Email Adam Martin       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Mark J. Marshall
only 16 IMAX films have been released in 3D
There were at least 24 between 1986 and 2002.

Imax developed a method of converting 2D animation to large-format 3D and showcased it in 2000's CyberWorld 3D, including a converted sequence from Antz. Imax has also been working on a system to convert 2D live-action films to large-format 3D, but I don't think it's been completed yet.

So whoop-de-doo, Lucas wants to release his movies in digital 3D. [Roll Eyes]

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John Wilson
Film God

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From: Sydney, Australia.
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 - posted 03-21-2005 04:53 AM      Profile for John Wilson   Email John Wilson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Never let the facts get in the way of a good suck up to the DIGITAL media.

(WOW, that media must be good...)

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Brian Michael Weidemann
Expert cat molester

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From: Costa Mesa, CA United States
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted 03-21-2005 06:50 AM      Profile for Brian Michael Weidemann   Author's Homepage   Email Brian Michael Weidemann   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Adam Martin
There were at least 24 between 1986 and 2002.
Yeah, I don't doubt that. I mean, even in my meagre 7 years working with the format, I personally have run at least 16 different IMAX 3D films. I don't know where they like to scrape these facts ... oh, wait, that was according to Cameron, supposedly.

As for Cyberworld 3D's rendition of Antz, I thought it was re-rendered; not just "converted" from the 2D animation. I mean, with CGI, it's easy enough just to plop another "camera" there and turn on the render-farm, right?

Now, converting previously existing 2D live action to "3D"? I can't imagine that whatever digital "fudging it" that's taking place is going to be impressive, but apparently it passes Lucas' "standards", so I'm curious now.

I'm pleased however that Cameron is backing IMAX and its 3D format, even though I don't think he's ever actually shot a frame of FILM on the features he's released that way (or am I wrong?). Digital conversion must be the way to go these days. (Although, for the record, I'm sure it was plenty difficult and expensive getting digital 3D cameras down to shoot the actual Titanic, so nevermind the logistics of getting the beast that is the IMAX 3D camera down there!)

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Bobby Henderson
"Ask me about Trajan."

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From: Lawton, OK, USA
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 - posted 03-21-2005 07:48 AM      Profile for Bobby Henderson   Email Bobby Henderson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I don't think the 3D is going to go over very well -or even be reasonably convincing. Regardless of what media types may say, you'll want to see the actual results for yourself. When it comes to technology, the media will simply parrot whatever sales pitch the tech guys spoon feed them.

Aside from 3D being a gimmick, I don't think many audiences can tolerate 3D content for anymore than an hour. A 45 minute documentary in IMAX 3D really pushes the limit. 3D movies make viewers do something unnatural with their eyes. Normally the focal plane and convergence point for your eyesight stays targeted at the same point. A 3D movie makes you focus on the screen, yet shift the convergence point in front of and behind the screen. You can do that for a while, but not confortably for two hours. Eye strain can really become a problem after about an hour. When I was a teenager, I could not get all the way through "Friday the 13th Park III in 3D" without taking off the glasses and rubbing my eyes.

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Mattias Ohlson
Expert Film Handler

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From: Falun, Sweden
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 - posted 03-21-2005 08:44 AM      Profile for Mattias Ohlson   Email Mattias Ohlson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Bobby H.
I agree with you. I see 3D as being very tiresome. I have had someone telling me just that. I am also surprised that they used an active stereo solution with the trouble of syncing projector and lcd-glasses. In addidtion the shutter glasses could be introducing artifacts. Why not a passive stereo solution and circular polarization. One big problem is light effience being reduced by about a factor of three.

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John Pytlak
Film God

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 - posted 03-21-2005 09:06 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The 3D IMAX prints of "The Polar Express" show what a well-produced film in that format can do. One of the most successful IMAX releases, filling theatres for weeks after Christmas. [thumbsup]

A running time of 100 minutes for "Polar Express" in 3D was not "tiresome" to me, but I agree 3D does not suit every movie.

Note that "Polar Express" was planned for a 3D release right from the start, and the high resolution CGI rendering and recording onto 65mm film was done specifically for 3D, rather than as an afterthought "conversion". [Roll Eyes]

Now if you excuse me, I'll go watch my "colorized" VHS videos of "Casablanca" and "It's a Wonderful Life", followed by the digitally "enhanced" DVDs of the Star Wars trilogy. [Wink]

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Mark J. Marshall
Film God

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From: New Castle, DE, USA
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 - posted 03-21-2005 09:37 AM      Profile for Mark J. Marshall     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
3D, if done correctly is not tiring on the eyes at all. I sat through 35 double interlocked full length 3D features in ten days, some days with five features back to back. The only eye strain I experienced was during "Gog" and I think that was because one eye had pretty good color and the other was faded. Even so, I only had a slight headache, and it went away in half an hour. The other three guys who were with me said it didn't affect them at all.

Now I'm not suggesting that every multiplex retrofit themselves for double interlock shows (althought that would be cool! [thumbsup] ), but that polarized 3D is definitely the way to go. Shutter glasses are expensive and the trouble of keeping them charged all the time is just an added pain in the ass that isn't worth it. It's a shame that Kodak (I think Jeff said it was Kodak) stopped work on Vectograph (I think that was what it was called, although I might not be spelling it correctly) 3D when they did. That was a process where they used dye transfer film, and the polarity was printed on the film in the dyes. BOTH eyes were printed on one piece of 35mm film, and no special lense was required... only a silver screen and polarized glasses. Jeff ran a demo for us at the 3D show, and considering the fact that it was a "work in progress" process, and they hadn't quite perfected it yet, it still looked incredible. I can't imagine what that would look like today had they continued developing it. [Frown]

Now, anaglyph for two hours... yeah that hurts. [Frown]

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John Pytlak
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From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
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 - posted 03-21-2005 10:01 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Kodak does have 3D systems that do not require glasses:

Kodak 3D R&D

quote:
Kodak Autostereoscopic Display finds applications in Industry, medicine, education - and more
The Kodak Autostereoscopic Display technology is intended for applications that call for prolonged viewing of detailed, three-dimensional images, such as medical evaluations or scientific analysis. Several industries are evaluating Kodak's stereoscopic imaging technology as a tool to study detailed imagery with increased resolution and less eye fatigue.


Kodak AutoStereoScopic Display Technology

quote:
Kodak Autostereoscopic Display eliminates Barriers to displays
The world of three-dimensional displays is about to change.

Most conventional 3-D display systems rely on barrier screens placed over an existing monitor - and barriers invariably reduce image resolution and clarity. Technologies such as parallax barriers and lenticular screens reduce the resolution of the image to present some of the data to the right eye and some of the data to the left eye.

The Kodak Autostereoscopic Display is a new concept that maintains full image resolution. Users need not wear different-lens glasses or headgear to "trick" the eyes. Instead, a proprietary new Kodak optic ball lens technology creates high-resolution display images, in an extremely wide field of view that delivers a 3-D experience.



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Jonathan Worthing
Master Film Handler

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From: Hereford, UK
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 - posted 03-21-2005 10:40 AM      Profile for Jonathan Worthing   Email Jonathan Worthing   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Talk about money for old rope

People may know that I am not the greatest Star Wars fan. I come after dead people as a fan.

What's the betting the sad people will be parked out side of the theatres, days before the opening of this [bs] .

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Paul Mayer
Oh get out of it Melvin, before it pulls you under!

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 - posted 03-21-2005 11:19 AM      Profile for Paul Mayer   Author's Homepage   Email Paul Mayer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In some places they already are Jonathan. They already are. [Roll Eyes]

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Frank Angel
Film God

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 - posted 03-21-2005 03:05 PM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Mark J. Marshall
3D, if done correctly is not tiring on the eyes at all. I sat through 35 double interlocked full length 3D features in ten days, some days with five features back to back. The only eye strain I experienced was during "Gog" and I think that was because one eye had pretty good color and the other was faded. Even so, I only had a slight headache, and it went away in half an hour. The other three guys who were with me said it didn't affect them at all.

I forth that emotion, Mark. I too was at Jeff's amazing 3D festival and sitting through four 3D features back-to-back, much to my amazement what with all the talk I used to hear about 3D giving people headachs, didn't cause me any eye discomfort or headaches whatsoever. But then again, that was probably the closest to a perfectly tuned 3D system as one could find anywhere. Ghosting was almost non-existant and image brightness was never a problem. And these presentations were of old material which is subject to base shrinkage problems; new prints of newly shot 3D material should go even further to perfect the system.

And yes, the Kodak polarized dye system was astounding -- single strip 3D without sacrificing half the film geography and halving the resolution and without reduction of light caused by the traditional polarization filters on the projectors. This system would go a long way to that goal of getting 3D into mulitplexes where dual projection is now only a 3D lover's wet dream due to the fact that so many screens today are outfitted with only a single projector. If indeed 3D is to make a come-back (I mean REAL 3D, not old 2D film somehow "converted" to look like 3D [to some blind directors]), then the Kodak system could make it an easy reality. And gee, you STILL wouldn't have to outfit every screen with a $150,000 video projector. Which reminds me of that old Ethel Merman song, "Film can do anything vid' can do better....yes it can."

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Christian Appelt
Jedi Master Film Handler

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From: Frankfurt, Germany
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 - posted 03-21-2005 04:30 PM      Profile for Christian Appelt   Email Christian Appelt   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I hardly can wait to see the very people (sadly, the majority of directors and DPs) who have nearly destroyed the cinema experience by giving us nonstop shaky, grainy, desaturated, murky colored, shallow-focus cinematography making 3D movies!
[Eek!]

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