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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Large Format Forum   » Star Trek sequel in 35mm. And in 3D. And in IMAX. (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Star Trek sequel in 35mm. And in 3D. And in IMAX.
Allan Young
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 - posted 03-12-2012 07:17 AM      Profile for Allan Young   Email Allan Young   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This must be one of the more bizarre shooting processes in recent years. JJ Abrams is filming the Star Trek sequel in 35mm and converting it to 3D. That's a fairly odd decision in itself, but a recently released on-set shot also shows an IMAX camera in use - have a look here.

If that's the new digital 3D IMAX camera, why not just use it for the entire film to save on the negative scanning and conversion process ? Or are they planning to letterbox the 35mm footage and have the screen expand vertically for the digital IMAX footage ?

If it's a film camera, it doesn't look big enough to be an IMAX 3D rig. In which case, are they planning to release the movie in 2D on IMAX screens with the native IMAX footage cut in, as with The Dark Knight ?

Given that there are probably going to be precious few 15/70 installations left by the time the movie is released, I suspect the former. Either way, it's a strange business.

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Jonathan Goeldner
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 - posted 03-12-2012 09:01 AM      Profile for Jonathan Goeldner   Email Jonathan Goeldner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
your link doesn't work.

here's a excerpt from collider.com regarding the 3D/film stock issue you ask, no mention of an IMAX camera though:

Are you shooting Star Trek 2 in 3D, or will you be converting it later?

ABRAMS: We’re shooting on film, and the reason for that is I wanted to shoot with anamorphic, and you can’t shoot 3D in anamorphic.

Do you plan on using lens flares again, and have you thought about how the 3D will affect that, in converting it later?

ABRAMS: I’ve had some people make fun of me about that. Yeah, we’ve done some tests. Not only lens flare tests, but we’ve done 3D tests. We actually converted a bunch of the original movie, which looked really good. That was the thing that made me feel like, maybe that would be okay. But, I didn’t want to shoot the movie digitally.

But, it will be in 3D?

ABRAMS: It will be converted, for those who want to see it in 3D. But, I wanted to match the look of the first one and shoot it anamorphically.

Because the popularity of 3D has died down some, are you worried about the commercial viability of 3D?

ABRAMS: I did not fight for the 3D. It was something that the studio wanted to do, and I didn’t want to do it. And then, when I saw the first movie converted in sections, I thought that it actually looked really cool. So, I was okay with their doing it, as long as I could shoot the movie the way I wanted to, in anamorphic film, and then let them convert it. So, those who want to see it in 3D, which looked pretty cool, can do it, and those that want to see it in 2D can do that too.

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Martin McCaffery
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 - posted 03-12-2012 09:03 AM      Profile for Martin McCaffery   Author's Homepage   Email Martin McCaffery   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
certainly a ringing endorsement of 3D and digital [Wink]

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Allan Young
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 - posted 03-12-2012 09:09 AM      Profile for Allan Young   Email Allan Young   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Another attempt at a link.

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Jonathan Goeldner
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 - posted 03-12-2012 09:30 AM      Profile for Jonathan Goeldner   Email Jonathan Goeldner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
well...

you're right (as well as the captured on-set still). screenrant also is stating the film is being partially shot in IMAX

http://screenrant.com/star-trek-2-imax-3d-sandy-156554/

the story also states the movie will be post-converted for 3D

I hope Abrams doesn't do a Brad Bird and not present the IMAX shot scenes in compromised 2.35 AR for it's eventual home video bluray release.

in regards to the actual IMAX camera used for filming, it's possible it's the new Phantom 65 IMAX digital cameras that was used for 'Born to Be Wild' - which are lighter, quieter and can shoot more footage than the typical IMAX camera

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Allan Young
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 - posted 03-12-2012 11:27 AM      Profile for Allan Young   Email Allan Young   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Jonathan Goeldner
it's possible it's the new Phantom 65 IMAX digital cameras that was used for 'Born to Be Wild'
That's the guess I was making. I think the one used on 'Born to be Wild' was just a prototype but they've probably got a production model available by now.

So he's shooting on 35mm because he wants to use anamorphic lenses and convert the footage to 3D, yet he's also using a non-anamorphic digital 3D camera for some of the shots ?

As I say, it's a bizarre decision.

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Jonathan Goeldner
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 - posted 03-12-2012 12:20 PM      Profile for Jonathan Goeldner   Email Jonathan Goeldner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I got the sense that the 3D conversion was done in post production none of it captured in-camera.

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Jonathan Froes
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 - posted 03-12-2012 05:53 PM      Profile for Jonathan Froes   Email Jonathan Froes   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
here's a good view of the camera in several scenes...

http://sciencefiction.com/2012/02/28/star-trek-2-set-video-of-quinto-and-cumberbatch-fighting/

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Shawn M. Martin
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 - posted 03-12-2012 08:16 PM      Profile for Shawn M. Martin     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
That looks like one of the MSM film cameras.

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Allan Young
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 - posted 03-13-2012 04:21 AM      Profile for Allan Young   Email Allan Young   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Shawn M. Martin
That looks like one of the MSM film cameras.
I think you're right.

In which case, I'm guessing it will be released in 2D in both 15/70 and Digital IMAX theatres, given that the company is so desperate to maintain that there's no real difference between the two.

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Mark J. Marshall
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 - posted 03-13-2012 12:53 PM      Profile for Mark J. Marshall     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
new Phantom 65 IMAX digital cameras that was used for 'Born to Be Wild'
THAT'S WHAT WAS WRONG WITH BORN TO BE WILD! I knew that footage just didn't look quite right, and I've been stumped about why for quite some time. Now I get it.

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Dick Vaughan
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 - posted 03-14-2012 08:11 AM      Profile for Dick Vaughan   Author's Homepage   Email Dick Vaughan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Not all of Born To Be Wild was shot on digital, it was split between 1565 and digital.

From Film production notes :

"Shooting the IMAX documentary in the spectacular IMAX 15/70, while also capturing nuanced animal behavior, called for a special camera in addition to the cumbersome 70mm IMAX film camera. Director of photography David Douglas helped the IMAX camera team develop a new digital 3D IMAX camera prototype that would address some of the limitations faced by wildlife filmmakers. Douglas, who has been lensing IMAX films for 35 years explains, “At just a quarter of the IMAX film camera’s 300-pound weight, the digital camera allowed us to go into places and situations that would have been impossible before. The result was a striking improvement that has redrawn the practice of large-format wildlife filmmaking.”

The camera is not only lighter but quieter, which made it possible to use natural ambient sounds and also solved another of the filmmakers’ concerns. Fellman attests, “One of our biggest fears was how the animals would respond to this terribly loud, enormous camera and crane. The last thing we wanted was for them to change their behavior or retreat all together.”

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Mark J. Marshall
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 - posted 03-14-2012 12:38 PM      Profile for Mark J. Marshall     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
That all totally makes sense. I was always just a little bit perplexed when I saw the footage for Born To Be Wild. Some of it looked pretty cool, and some just looked ... weird. I don't think it looked bad. Just different for some reason.

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Shawn M. Martin
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 - posted 03-14-2012 11:40 PM      Profile for Shawn M. Martin     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I should also add that the DP of this movie, Dan Mindel, is not a fan of digital, he likes to shoot exclusively in 35mm anamorphic, which is how almost all of his pictures have been shot, including his other two with Abrams. In fact, were it not for him, Abrams probably wouldn't even know what anamorphic is.

So it's more likely to me that, given the opportunity to shoot some of this in IMAX, both Mindel and Abrams would prefer to go "all the way" so to speak and use the real thing (film) and not digital.

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Allan Young
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 - posted 03-15-2012 04:25 AM      Profile for Allan Young   Email Allan Young   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Dick Vaughan
Not all of Born To Be Wild was shot on digital, it was split between 1565 and digital
I read somewhere (can't find the article again) that the original plan was to shoot only around 10 per cent digital, but they were so pleased with the footage they got with the digital camera that it ended up around 50/50.

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