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» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » The Afterlife   » IT CAME FROM OUT OF SPACE now on 3D Blu Ray (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: IT CAME FROM OUT OF SPACE now on 3D Blu Ray
Claude S. Ayakawa
Film God

Posts: 2724
From: Waipahu, Hawaii, USA
Registered: Aug 2002


 - posted 10-05-2016 06:34 PM      Profile for Claude S. Ayakawa   Author's Homepage   Email Claude S. Ayakawa   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I first saw IT CAME FROM OUT OF SPACE during it's first 3D theatrical showing in 1953 at the Liberty Theatre in Honolulu and I enjoyed it very much and was hoping one day it would be released in that format on Blu Ray. The day has come and the movie is now out on disc in 3D and it is terrific!. It is so good, I consider it one of the best disc released in the format and truly show how 50's 3D film making was much more superior to modern films. Unlike other 3D films released at the time, IT CAME FROM OUT OF SPACE, made subtle use of 3D and did not revert to gimmicks to show of the format. Unlike most modern films, the film has a lot of depth and at time images protrude out from the screen.

The film is in the 1.33:1 flat aspect ratio and in B&W and was directed by Jack Arnold and starred Richard Carlson, Barbara Rush and Charles Drake. The Universal-International 3D film was restored by the 3DFilm Archive group headed by Robert Furmanek and Grey Kintz . The disc is available only at Best Buy at the moment as a store exclusive for less than $10.00.

-Claude

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Mark Ogden
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 865
From: Little Falls, N.J.
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 10-05-2016 07:47 PM      Profile for Mark Ogden   Email Mark Ogden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It's, ah, It Came From Outer Space, isn't it?

Saw a very nice original print of this, 3D and the original sepia tone, just a few years back at Tarentino's New Beverly Cinema. Double feature with This Island Earth. The tie-in, besides being both Universal pictures, was that the Metallunian Mutant in the latter film was a rejected design for the alien in the former. Both were designed by former Disney animator Millicent Patrick, who also designed the Creature From the Black Lagoon (which is probably more than you wanted to know about any of this).

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Claude S. Ayakawa
Film God

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From: Waipahu, Hawaii, USA
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 - posted 10-05-2016 08:07 PM      Profile for Claude S. Ayakawa   Author's Homepage   Email Claude S. Ayakawa   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I stand corrected on the title of the Movie, Thanks.

Where did you hear IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE was in sepia during it's original release? My memory going back to the fifties is very good and I definitely remember seeing the 3D movie in regular B&W. in 1953 and that is the way it is on the Blu Ray.. Perhaps Robert Fumanek could enlighten us with the correct answer.

-Claude

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Mark Ogden
Jedi Master Film Handler

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From: Little Falls, N.J.
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 - posted 10-05-2016 08:34 PM      Profile for Mark Ogden   Email Mark Ogden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well, it was billed as an original print, and it was sepia toned. I found a picture from another screening just now:

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Possibly it is a case of "some prints were, some were not".

Here's a web page with more.

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Robert Furmanek
Expert Film Handler

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From: Clifton, NJ, USA
Registered: Jun 2012


 - posted 10-05-2016 09:38 PM      Profile for Robert Furmanek   Author's Homepage   Email Robert Furmanek       Edit/Delete Post 
That's not sepia-toned. That's a recent print stuck from a badly faded anaglyphic negative. Yikes!

It was released in high-quality polarized 3-D in 1953, the inferior red/cyan conversion was done circa 1972.

Universal considered a dual-35mm sepia release in 1953 but scrapped the idea after sending their tech people to see Columbia's 3-D Man in the Dark in sepia. The loss of light with the polarization filters was too much so they went straight black and white on IT.

There's more info here: http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/it-came-from-outer-space

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Robert Furmanek
Expert Film Handler

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From: Clifton, NJ, USA
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 - posted 10-07-2016 01:33 PM      Profile for Robert Furmanek   Author's Homepage   Email Robert Furmanek       Edit/Delete Post 
For the first time in 63 years, people are seeing IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE with the original intermission card. It's created some confusion as to why a short film would require a break so I've updated the 3-D Myths page with the answer. Please share!

http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/home/top-10-3-d-myths

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Jim Cassedy
Phenomenal Film Handler

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From: San Francisco, CA
Registered: Dec 2006


 - posted 10-07-2016 09:44 PM      Profile for Jim Cassedy   Email Jim Cassedy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
It's, ah, It Came From Outer Space, isn't it?
I thought it was "It Came From Out Of Outer Space" [Roll Eyes]

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Jonathan Goeldner
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From: Washington, District of Columbia
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 - posted 10-15-2016 11:26 PM      Profile for Jonathan Goeldner   Email Jonathan Goeldner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
it's "Outta" [Wink] LOL

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Frank Angel
Film God

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From: Brooklyn NY USA
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 11-09-2016 11:09 AM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Bob, this made me wonder, was it a common thing for films, say after the era of sound, to be presented in sepia tone? Yes, I know silent features were hand-"colored" but was sepia-tone used on major sound B&W (or more accurately stated, Black & Sepia) releases...ever? And if not, then it is puzzling why Universal or Jack Arnold would even consider a sepia tone release for a major release, especially one that already had a hook -- 3D and stereo sound.

I know Filmack, the Chicago company that produced and snipes and daters in B&W would offer you the ability to order them printed on tinted stock. This was nice if you wanted to give some sense of color when you weren't rich enough to order color versions, to at lease give a sense of color when you were splicing them in with color trailers...the tinted snipes weren't as jarring if they came between color material as would be plain B&W, but I've never came across a full-length feature that was B&W stock on sepia-toned stock.

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Robert Furmanek
Expert Film Handler

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From: Clifton, NJ, USA
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 - posted 11-09-2016 02:38 PM      Profile for Robert Furmanek   Author's Homepage   Email Robert Furmanek       Edit/Delete Post 
Oh, yes. There were lots of sepia releases in 35mm, including MAN IN THE DARK, SPOOKS and BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS in 1953. Plenty of westerns too.

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Frank Angel
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From: Brooklyn NY USA
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 - posted 11-10-2016 07:03 AM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Ah...learn something new every day. Coincidently, I actually did see BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS when I was a kid in the Scouras Bayside Theatre in Queens NY. I can't remember it being in sepia -- but of course that doesn't mean it wasn't. Then again, I was probably too young to notice, although I was fairly astute in noticing cinematic oddities, for example, the stop-motion, jittery movement of the beast in BF2KF had the same quality as the movement of King Kong. No, I am not THAT old to have seen KING KONG in the theatres -- a station in NYC had a program "The Million Dollar Movie" (a movie that cost a million dollars...how quaint!) and they got rights to KING KONG or perhaps the station was partly owned by RKO, who knows, but they ran it literally three times a day for a week or more. I watched in on the 12in TV screen with my kid brother many nights until mom put a stop to it.

And I remember you never saw ads for movies on TV. But seems they were very innovative in marketing BEAST because I did see shorter versions of the trailer as TV ads. Movies just weren't sold to TV in those days and they didn't run ads for them either, so seeing this prehistoric beast on my TV made it something I HAD to see and pestered my parents day in and day out till they capitulated, just to shut me up, I think.

Movies were indeed special events back then. How times have changed, eh? Now they give them away for a dollar.

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Mitchell Dvoskin
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From: West Milford, NJ, USA
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 - posted 11-10-2016 12:24 PM      Profile for Mitchell Dvoskin   Email Mitchell Dvoskin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
> perhaps the station was partly owned by RKO

It was the other way around. In the late 1950's, General Tire, which already owned WOR (radio and tv) in New York, bought RKO from Howard Hughes, primarily to gain access to the RKO film library for their television stations. Shortly thereafter, they shut down the studio and sold the lot and all it's contents to Desi and Lucy who renamed the studio Desilu. At that point, General Tire renamed their broadcasting division to RKO General.

Years ago, A friend of mine had a 35mm promotional short made for Westinghouse, filmed just after Desi and Lucy acquired the RKO studio. The plot of this short was that Desi was taking some Westinghouse executives on a tour of the studio, while Lucy was trying to convince Desi to buy her every Westinghouse appliance. It was rather funny. I remember as they walked though the prop department, seeing the King Kong model on a shelf. Everything in the studio was still as it was the day that RKO was shutdown.

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Robert Furmanek
Expert Film Handler

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From: Clifton, NJ, USA
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 - posted 11-10-2016 09:14 PM      Profile for Robert Furmanek   Author's Homepage   Email Robert Furmanek       Edit/Delete Post 
There were many in the 30's and 40's but other sepia releases of the 1950's include all the Wild Bill Elliot and Gene Autry westerns; the Johnny Weismuller Jungle Jim features, FLAME OF STAMBOUL, THE JUNGLE, WACO, PURPLE HEART DIARY, A YANK IN INDO-CHINA, SKY COMMANDO, THE RIDE BACK, THIS IS RUSSIA, THE TOUGHER THEY COME and the opening/closing scenes of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

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Frank Angel
Film God

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From: Brooklyn NY USA
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 - posted 11-11-2016 01:17 AM      Profile for Frank Angel   Author's Homepage   Email Frank Angel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I wonder if any sepia prints still exist -- collectors, some of the archives....LOC perhaps? Having seen almost every format and unique presentation type, at least since the early 50's, I think it would be fun to experience watching a full length feature in sepia tone. I suppose one could get that same effect by taking a B&W print and just using a yellow/orange filter in front of the lens, but who knows -- having the base actually tinted sepia might have a subtle difference than just filtering the light. Interesting stuff.

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Robert Furmanek
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From: Clifton, NJ, USA
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 - posted 11-11-2016 11:28 AM      Profile for Robert Furmanek   Author's Homepage   Email Robert Furmanek       Edit/Delete Post 
I'm sure there are many prints out there. The sepia 35mm BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS screened in New York in the 1990's and we've got a left side of SPOOKS. Here's a frame:
 -

This article is quite interesting: http://www.archive.org/stream/internationalpr383940finn#page/n213/mode/2up

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