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» Film-Tech Forum   » Community   » The Afterlife   » Psycho [1960] (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Psycho [1960]
Evans A Criswell
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1579
From: Huntsville, AL, USA
Registered: Mar 2000


 - posted 11-02-2001 10:21 AM      Profile for Evans A Criswell   Author's Homepage   Email Evans A Criswell   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I showed this movie to some friends on Halloween night and it had been 3 years (since another Halloween party in 1998) that I'd seen this movie. It's definitely a classic that people enjoy seeing again on occasion. Two people at my party had never seen it before and one person had seen it many times and voted for it.

Psycho is a very interesting movie. Every time I see the movie, I notice some detail that I never noticed before. I typically do not like thriller movies, but this one is different and original, with only three violent scenes. On the first viewing, nobody knows when the violence is going to happen, and that suspense keeps people on the edge. In the 1998 remake of Psycho, as I sat through it, I was on the edge because I was expecting something new to be thrown in to catch everyone off guard that was familiar with the 1960 version, and although the 1998 version was a straight remake with no such additions, the suspense created by that expectation certainly worked.

For people who have seen the movie several times and are familiar with it, humor is often found in some of the lines. At the 1998 Halloween party, many of us laughed at some of the lines because everyone had previously seen the movie.

The cinematography was wonderful in Psycho. The DVD we watched was letterboxed to 1.85:1. preserving the original framing. The music used in the film was very effective. After seeing this movie, the music tends to get "stuck in one's head".

If anyone here has not seen this movie, I highly recommend it. Get the DVD of the 1960 version with the 1.85:1 framing.

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Evans A Criswell
Huntsville-Decatur Movie Theatre Information Site

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John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 11-02-2001 12:33 PM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The best of Hitchcock is hard to beat! Motel showers will never be the same.

Saul Bass worked closely with Hitchcock on several films, and is generally credited with the "design" of the shower scene:
http://nextdch.mty.itesm.mx/~plopezg/Kaplan/people/bass.html
http://www.saulbass.net/psychostudio/
http://www.houseofhorrors.com/psycho.htm
http://members.austarmetro.com.au/~xander/dream/artists/saulbass.html

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Cell: 716-781-4036 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com
Web site: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion


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Dave Bird
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 727
From: Perth, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Jun 2000


 - posted 11-02-2001 03:30 PM      Profile for Dave Bird   Author's Homepage   Email Dave Bird   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
AMC ran a feature about it the other night. Apparently Hitchcock ABSOLUTELY REFUSED to allow ANY music during the shower scene. Of course, whoever (sorry can't recall who) wrote the score barged ahead and put one in, Hitchcock loved it (after initial anger that his direction was ignored) and the rest is history.....

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Will Kutler
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1492
From: Tucson, AZ, USA
Registered: Feb 2001


 - posted 11-02-2001 06:00 PM      Profile for Will Kutler   Email Will Kutler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Many of the Psyco sets/props are at Universal Studios Holloywood, are alive and well, and are a part of the standard tour.

The shower was a free standing affair with scaffolding on all four corners with dozens of cameras adjusted to capture every angle. Watch this scene very closely and you will notice that the knife never touches the victim! i believe that the blood was choclate syrup--yum, yum ! Excellent editing.

The Bates house is a 1/3 (I believe) scaled set used for camera/tric perspective!


Speaking of horror films, I would love to see Lon Cheney's London After Midnight but no prints are known to exist of this classic silent flic of the 1920's

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Joe Beres
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 606
From: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Registered: Nov 2000


 - posted 11-02-2001 07:03 PM      Profile for Joe Beres   Email Joe Beres   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I believe the score was written by Bernard Hermann, who collaborated with Hitchcock on several films. And as I understand it, the chocolate syrup was Hershey's, yum yum indeed.

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Rachel Gilardi
Madam Moderator

Posts: 2214
From: Peabody, MA, USA
Registered: Dec 2007


 - posted 11-05-2001 01:56 AM      Profile for Rachel Gilardi   Email Rachel Gilardi   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
You know what? I've never seen this. It seems like I've never watched alot of the classic horror films.....like The Exorcist, Halloween, Carrie, etc...hmmmm I have some renting to do.

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Will Kutler
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1492
From: Tucson, AZ, USA
Registered: Feb 2001


 - posted 11-05-2001 07:48 PM      Profile for Will Kutler   Email Will Kutler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The remixed soundtrack on the rerelease of Exorcist was awesome---very detailed! Best I've heard in a long time!

Some of the really classic horror films that I would love to see is Edison's--thats Thomas--Frankenstein and Lon Cheney Sr's London After Midnight! Unfortuneatly no prints are known to exist--all there is left are some still images and posters.

Trivia--did you know that the origonal sets for Universal's 1931 Boris Karloff Frankenstein were dug up and used for Young Frankenstein!

Biography on A & E bioed Bella Lugosi and spoke about how eastern European actors were typecast. Lugosi was buried in his cape--and he was actually a very famous and gifted Hungarian actor--word had it that his English was very limited at the time he made Dracula--that he spoke phoenaticly--his accent was authentic. Lugosi also turned down the role of the monster in Universal's 1931 Frankenstein because he had no dialogue--ego trip!

Boris Karloff er William Henry Pratt was bioed on the classic television show This Is Your Life--this episode is really something to see!

Vincent Price was another first class gentleman! Spent much time and gave much $$ to educational instutions (colleges and universities) I was very fortunate to have attended one of his lectures at the University of AZ--got to meet him too--WHAT A MENSCH! He was also a noted art collector and gourmet chef! One of my favorites was the House of Wax--which was a remake of Terror in the Wax Museum. House of Wax MUST be seen in its origonal 3D format to be fully appreciated!

I can go on some more, but I'll give someone else a chance....

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Leo Enticknap
Film God

Posts: 6867
From: Loma Linda, CA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 11-12-2001 07:37 AM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
For more on this film, see Stephen Rebello, 'Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho' (2nd ed., Marion Boyars Publishing, 1988), ISBN 0714530034. It's available to order from Amazon.


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Rachel Gilardi
Madam Moderator

Posts: 2214
From: Peabody, MA, USA
Registered: Dec 2007


 - posted 11-12-2001 02:37 PM      Profile for Rachel Gilardi   Email Rachel Gilardi   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Isn't everything available to buy on Amazon???

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Leo Enticknap
Film God

Posts: 6867
From: Loma Linda, CA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 11-13-2001 02:36 AM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Not if it's out of print. That book originally came out in the early '90s - I have the first edition - and so checked that it was still available before posting those details. After all there would hardly be any point in saying 'Why don't you buy this great book but, err, sorry, you can't get it any more.'

Another potential issue can be that some things are available through amazon.com which are not available through amazon.co.uk and vice-versa. However this is more of a problem with videos than books, and (I guess) more likely to be a problem trying to order things from our side of the pond than from yours.

During the summer I ordered a DVD of the restored 'Grass' from Facets and it took six weeks to arrive, thanks to UK customs having stopped it. A friend half-jokingly speculated that this was because they thought it was a video about cannabis rather than a 1920s exploration documentary! I don't know if US customers have the same problem ordering things from Europe, but would guess that any transatlantic mailing of bulky packages is now going to be subject to biochemical warfare paranoia for the foreseeable future.

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Rachel Gilardi
Madam Moderator

Posts: 2214
From: Peabody, MA, USA
Registered: Dec 2007


 - posted 11-13-2001 03:22 AM      Profile for Rachel Gilardi   Email Rachel Gilardi   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Leo,
I was kidding. It's just kind of annoying how everything you click on brings you to Amazon.com

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John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 11-14-2001 08:27 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Rachel said: "It's just kind of annoying how everything you click on brings you to Amazon.com"

You're so right! Click here for more information:
Click Here

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7525A
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Cell: 716-781-4036 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com
Web site: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion


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Leo Enticknap
Film God

Posts: 6867
From: Loma Linda, CA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 11-15-2001 05:10 AM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
True, though I've found Facets Video of Chigaco - www.facets.org - invaluable for rare video and DVD titles, including out of print stuff. Their catalogue is the size of two or three house bricks, prices are very reasonable, and when the British customs don't think I'm some pervert trying to import hard-core porn, the orders always arrive (from half way across the world) within a week.

Amazon can be cheaper, but I've found that they tend to take longer and are more likely to make mistakes.

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Bernard Tonks
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 619
From: Cranleigh, Surrey, England
Registered: Apr 2001


 - posted 11-15-2001 08:27 AM      Profile for Bernard Tonks   Email Bernard Tonks   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Rachel, you must see the 1960 version of Psycho, and if you do think of us old time projectionists who did changeovers in those days. One particular changeover on my first run frightened the pants off me, which was a very fast shot going down the stairs in the Bates house with that awesome shrieking music! You might see the cue dots still on the DVD or video. I wonder how many changeovers were missed in its early history, I certainly nearly did once.

Release prints were masked 1.66:1 which was Odeon cinemas adopted wide screen ratio. ABC circuit and others’ wide screens were 1.75:1.

(Error deleted)



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Leo Enticknap
Film God

Posts: 6867
From: Loma Linda, CA
Registered: Jul 2000


 - posted 11-15-2001 10:38 AM      Profile for Leo Enticknap   Author's Homepage   Email Leo Enticknap   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hitch used Vistavision a lot during the 50s (e.g. North by Northwest, Vertigo, The Trouble With Harry) but Psycho was made on conventional b/w 35mm on a low budget, mainly by the TV crew who did 'Alfred Hitchcock Presents'. The studio he was contracted to, Paramount, thought that the subject matter was too much of a risk to put serious money into and so it had no recognised 'stars' and a minimal production budget.

On some prints there is a 1.85 hard matte over some of the shots of Janet Leigh in the shower so that if anyone shows it in 1.66 or Academy, the picture won't be too 'revealing'...

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