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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Film Handlers' Forum   » 70mm 50th Anniversary 2001 A Space Odyssey (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: 70mm 50th Anniversary 2001 A Space Odyssey
David J Hilsgen
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 153
From: SAUK RAPIDS,MN . USA
Registered: Aug 2004


 - posted 03-29-2018 10:55 PM      Profile for David J Hilsgen   Email David J Hilsgen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Emagine Willow Creek in Plymouth, MN just got confirmed on a play date June 29th to July 5th

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Jonathan Goeldner
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1304
From: Washington, District of Columbia
Registered: Jun 2008


 - posted 03-30-2018 01:08 PM      Profile for Jonathan Goeldner   Email Jonathan Goeldner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
my fingers are crossed that AFI Silver get's the new print in May

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Stephan Shelley
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 628
From: castro valley, CA, usa
Registered: Nov 2014


 - posted 03-30-2018 03:32 PM      Profile for Stephan Shelley   Email Stephan Shelley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Grand Lake Oakland CA late August.Sounds like they may be circulating a small number of prints.

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Blaine Young
Master Film Handler

Posts: 475
From: Kirkland, WA, USA
Registered: Sep 2006


 - posted 04-10-2018 01:01 PM      Profile for Blaine Young   Email Blaine Young   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Any word how this differs from the reissue in 2001? New prints? Reprints of the old run? New sound mix?

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Scott Norwood
Film God

Posts: 7944
From: Boston, MA. USA (1774.21 miles northeast of Dallas)
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 04-10-2018 01:23 PM      Profile for Scott Norwood   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Norwood   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Somerville (Boston area) has it booked for 6/1-6/14.

http://www.in70mm.com/now_showing/index.htm

also has it listed as playing at the Music Box (Chicago) and City Cinemas Village East (NYC) starting on 5/18.

Is there a consensus on whether or not City Cinemas Village East is a reputable 70mm venue?

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Mark Lensenmayer
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1576
From: Upper Arlington, OH
Registered: Sep 1999


 - posted 04-10-2018 07:21 PM      Profile for Mark Lensenmayer   Email Mark Lensenmayer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Website for Gateway Film Center in Columbus shows 2001 opening in 70mm for 10 days starting 6/16/18.

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David Stambaugh
Film God

Posts: 4016
From: Eugene, Oregon
Registered: Jan 2002


 - posted 04-10-2018 08:28 PM      Profile for David Stambaugh   Author's Homepage   Email David Stambaugh   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
From what I’ve read they’re deliberately billing it as “unrestored and original”. Nothing changed.

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Martin Brooks
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 782
From: Forest Hills, NY, USA
Registered: May 2002


 - posted 04-11-2018 11:34 PM      Profile for Martin Brooks   Author's Homepage   Email Martin Brooks   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Scott Norwood
Is there a consensus on whether or not City Cinemas Village East is a reputable 70mm venue?

Yes, they've played 70mm before. If it's on the main screen, which is 440 seats, it's pretty good, although I don't remember how large that screen is - I haven't been there in a few years.. The building is a former synagogue and the main screen still has much of that old architecture.

But it would have probably been better on the 70mm screen at the eWalk, which played "The Hateful Eight" in 70mm, although I haven't been there since they renovated and put in lounge seating and reduced the seat count on that screen from 490 to 204, but assuming they didn't change the screen, it's a 62' screen. Or on the "Loews" screen at the Lincoln Square.

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Michael Coate
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1860
From: Los Angeles, California
Registered: Feb 2001


 - posted 04-15-2018 02:34 PM      Profile for Michael Coate   Email Michael Coate   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The Loft in Tucson is confirmed for June 22-28.

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Mark Ogden
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 857
From: Little Falls, N.J.
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 04-15-2018 03:18 PM      Profile for Mark Ogden   Email Mark Ogden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Martin Brooks
The building is a former synagogue and the main screen still has much of that old architecture.
Never a synagogue, it was actually built as a Yiddish theatre, much as the late lamented Landmark Sunshine was. The upstairs auditorium, the former Jaffe Theatre where 70mm shows happen, is beautiful.

I believe they have a Simplex 35/70 up there. They catch all the 70mm shows that come through, and they usually do a good if not spectacular job (although they were off the screen once with The Hateful Eight , I didn't hear why).

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Martin Brooks
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 782
From: Forest Hills, NY, USA
Registered: May 2002


 - posted 04-16-2018 10:14 PM      Profile for Martin Brooks   Author's Homepage   Email Martin Brooks   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Mark Ogden
Never a synagogue, it was actually built as a Yiddish theatre, much as the late lamented Landmark Sunshine was. The upstairs auditorium, the former Jaffe Theatre where 70mm shows happen, is beautiful.
You're correct - my mistake

quote: Mark Ogden
I believe they have a Simplex 35/70 up there. They catch all the 70mm shows that come through, and they usually do a good if not spectacular job (although they were off the screen once with The Hateful Eight , I didn't hear why).

I didn't see it there, but I would guess it's because it was Ultra-Pan with an AR of 2.75:1 and it was too wide for their screen.

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Mark Ogden
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 857
From: Little Falls, N.J.
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 04-26-2018 10:37 PM      Profile for Mark Ogden   Email Mark Ogden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In Boston, it will move from the Somerville to the Cooledge Corner from 6/15. Or so I'm told.

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Robert Harris
Film Handler

Posts: 87
From: Bedford Hills, NY, USA
Registered: May 2003


 - posted 05-08-2018 01:32 AM      Profile for Robert Harris   Email Robert Harris   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
New dupe neg, derived from a previously unused IP.

While dupes should be built in, the prints should still be lovely.

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Jean-Pierre Gutzeit
Film Handler

Posts: 19
From: Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Registered: Nov 2012


 - posted 05-12-2018 07:49 PM      Profile for Jean-Pierre Gutzeit   Author's Homepage   Email Jean-Pierre Gutzeit   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Pleasing that there is still an apparently useful 65mm Interpositiv from 1999. An expensive order, and I am amazed at why this interpositive was not used when the 70 millimeter re-printing series was in progress between 2001 and 2017.
It was once heard that in the late 1980s "Ben Hur" and "2001" Warner produced 65mm Intermediates. If that's true, then one would have to assume that since 2001, the re-editions of "2001" have relied on a 12-year-old intermediate exposure and only a new mix of the sound masters took place.
Almost all 70mm prints of 2001-2017 had a fluctuating light and color balance, were very grainy, greenish blue green saturated and how are compared to the first run prints also without perfect frame steadiness. The sound mix was balanced towards the center channel. The directional original mix was only to be heard on the contemporary, but now color faded first run prints or on a letterbox DVD Edition from the 1990s still understandable. The brand new version of 2018 promises to bring back the original sound mix. In the sense of preserving the original format, it is gratifying to produce a new Intermediate negative from a better light-determined interpositive.
The interpositive from 1999 could also have a better color saturation than if you make another interpositive from the original negative in 2018.

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Mark Ogden
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 857
From: Little Falls, N.J.
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 05-12-2018 09:40 PM      Profile for Mark Ogden   Email Mark Ogden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The real story on what this release is and isn't, via the NY Times.

Christopher Nolan was 7 years old when he went to see Stanley Kubrick’s classic “2001: A Space Odyssey” in London with his father. He was gobsmacked.
“You sit there and you just go, ‘This is a film that’s not observing any conventions,’” Mr. Nolan said in a phone interview from Los Angeles.
Four decades later, Mr. Nolan has himself been compared to Kubrick for a similarly meticulous approach to filmmaking and a taste for ambitious productions like “Interstellar.” He shrugs off those comparisons — Mr. Nolan said he’s just a fan — but for his latest project, he put himself directly in Kubrick’s shoes. On Saturday, he’s going to the Cannes Film Festival for the first time to screen a restored 70-millimeter print of Kubrick’s seminal work to celebrate its 50th anniversary.
But calling it a restoration, Mr. Nolan said, isn’t quite right. He prefers “unrestored.”
Mr. Nolan set out last fall to recreate the experience audiences had in 1968, allowing moviegoers today to see the epic exactly as Kubrick intended. His goal meant there would be no digital manipulation in the new version but the occasional visible scratch would be allowed to slip through. In a world of high-definition and 4K resolution, Mr. Nolan is, in effect, time-traveling to the days of analog. Think of it as listening to a classic record on vinyl, with pops and all.

Mr. Nolan has long been a passionate proponent of the 70-millimeter format. His war drama, “Dunkirk,” was shown in 70 millimeter at more than 100 theaters across the country last year. “It’s not about nostalgia,” Mr. Nolan said. “It’s a totally different way of watching a movie, and it’s in danger of being lost.”

Paradoxically, Mr. Nolan got involved in the Kubrick project when he was remastering the films in his own library last fall, digitally restoring them in 4K Ultra High Definition.
Ned Price, the vice president of restoration at Warner Bros., was working in the same lab on a similar update of “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Mr. Price asked Mr. Nolan if he wanted to see copies of the original prints, the film industry equivalent of offering a historian access to an ancient manuscript.
In 1999, as part of a preservation project, Mr. Price’s team had made an “interpositive” of the film — essentially a protection copy of the original camera negatives, made up of 20 reels tucked away in a Burbank studio. To accomplish this in less than a year, the Warner Bros. team carefully cleaned the original negatives, removed old repairs and created new interpositives. The negatives, from which the preservation copies were made, were slightly shrunken and had some color fading. That was where the work stopped. The copies of the original reels were meant only for preservation, not for distribution.
But they were still in good enough shape that an intrigued Mr. Nolan approached the studio about continuing the work that had begun almost two decades ago. He proposed taking it one step further: recreating the 1968 theatrical release. Warner Bros. readily agreed.

Mr. Price and Mr. Nolan began by making duplicate negatives and then initiated a complex method of color correction. This process required some imagining of what Kubrick would want, with prompting from the faded source material.
“If the filmmaker intended the walls to be sort of green and you try to make them white, then other things will be problematic,” Mr. Price said. “The flesh tones will go off. The whites will turn magenta. Strange things will happen. To a certain degree, you have to listen to the camera negative itself.”

There was a singular aim to view the film in its first cinematic form. Instead of fixing several tears in the original negative, the team thought it would be more authentic to retain them. The original 35-millimeter six-channel soundtrack had decayed beyond repair, so Mr. Nolan sourced audio from a 35-millimeter preservation element made in the 1980s — a format rarely, if ever, used anymore.
During the process, Mr. Nolan discovered new quirks in “2001” that even he, a fan of the movie since childhood, hadn’t noticed before. For example, when Dave Bowman, the astronaut played by Keir Dullea, deactivates the supercomputer HAL, the machine asks Bowman if he’d like to hear a song (“Daisy Bell,” from 1892.) Before the restoration (or unrestoration), Mr. Nolan thought Bowman acquiesced to break the tension. But after dozens of viewings since the fall, he has found another motive: aggression.
“He’s saying, ‘Sing it for me,’ because he wants to be sure that he’s actually killing the computer as it sings,” Mr. Nolan said. “He wants to hear it disintegrate. I just never felt that. I never spotted that before.”
That Mr. Nolan found something new after all these years is not surprising to Katharina Kubrick, the daughter of the celebrated director. She recently caught a continuity error in the film she hadn’t seen before, although she wouldn’t say what it was. She said Kubrick would have been thrilled that Mr. Nolan was putting the same care into his film that he would have.

“I think it’s awesome actually,” said Ms. Kubrick, who will appear with Mr. Nolan at Cannes. “This is a movie that’s a half-century old and the fact that people are still fascinated, arguing about it and debating it and that it influenced many directors and filmmakers is nothing short of incredible.”
Stanley Kubrick’s films never played Cannes while he was alive (he died in 1999), and so far neither have Mr. Nolan’s. “I love the idea of going for the first time with an acknowledged masterpiece of another filmmaker,” Mr. Nolan said with a laugh. “I would say that’s a low-stress way of going.”
After the newest (oldest?) version of “2001” has its premiere at Cannes, it will open in select theaters in the United States on May 18. This fall, Warner Bros. will release a 4K version of the film. But it’s the analog version — stripped to its roots — that fascinates Mr. Nolan: “What I want audiences to take away is what I took away when I was a kid seeing it.”

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