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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Film Handlers' Forum   » Anhydrous Alchohol for cleaning (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Anhydrous Alchohol for cleaning
Graeme David Pirrie
Film Handler

Posts: 2
From: Litchfield, NH, USA
Registered: Jul 2004


 - posted 07-27-2004 09:27 AM      Profile for Graeme David Pirrie   Email Graeme David Pirrie   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Need to find a supplier of Anhydrous Alchohol for cleaning purposes. Does anyone hava a supplier I can contact? I will need to specify bottles that are less than 1 liter. Thanks

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Floyd Justin Newton
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 559
From: Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Registered: Jun 2002


 - posted 07-27-2004 11:58 AM      Profile for Floyd Justin Newton   Email Floyd Justin Newton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Alcohol can be found in any drug store... comes in quart bottles.
HOWEVER, some parts of projection equipment are made of plastic,
and alcohol could damage them.

fjn

local 294 Ret.

P.S. The alcohol you are looking for is common rubbing alcohol.

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Andrew Shingleton
Film Handler

Posts: 63
From: Richmond, Victoria, Australia
Registered: Feb 2004


 - posted 07-27-2004 12:40 PM      Profile for Andrew Shingleton   Email Andrew Shingleton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
We just go to our local chemist and buy 100ml bottles of isopropyl alcohol - can't remember the cost but it's less than $10AUD so it's not very expensive. If you want bigger bottles you usually have to get them to order it in for you.

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Ron Yost
Master Film Handler

Posts: 344
From: Paso Robles, CA
Registered: Aug 2003


 - posted 07-27-2004 01:10 PM      Profile for Ron Yost   Email Ron Yost   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Anhydrous alcohol is -not- common antiseptic 'rubbing' (isoprophyl) alcohol. It is denatured ethyl alcohol (ethanol), derived from wood. It can be bought in paint stores as Shellac thinner.

I don't know what you want to clean with it, but if it's cleaning projection equipment you want isoprophyl, -not- anhydrous alcohol. It's available from drugstores in various strengths .. up to 90%.

Be careful with it, as suggested earlier. [Smile]

Ron Yost

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Randy Stankey
Film God

Posts: 6425
From: Erie, Pennsylvania
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 07-27-2004 01:45 PM      Profile for Randy Stankey   Email Randy Stankey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If you have some requirement for pure alcohol try going to the liquor store and buying some "Everclear".

Everclear is 190 proof (95% pure) grain alcohol. That's about as pure as a regular consumer is likely to get. Any stronger than that and you're probably going to have to go through an industrial supply company. You're probably going to have to submit a lot of paperwork to prove your intentions in using it.

I agree with the above people who say to keep the alcohol away from plastic and rubber parts, lest it attack the material the parts are made from.

Whatever you do, don't try to use "Denatured Alcohol" that you get from the hardware store. Yes, it is grain alcohol (ethanol) but it mixed with wood alcohol (METHanol) and a little bit of acetone to "denature" it. (i.e.: To make it undrinkable, thus not subject to liquor taxes and laws.) The only thing denatured alcohol is really good for is stripping shellac (and/or paint, etc.) and for use as a lamp fuel. Even though there is only a small amount of acetone in the mix, it will eat any/all parts that are made of plastic unless you are super careful with it.

Honestly, I echo the sentiments of those who post above: Just go to the local CVS or Wal-Mart and buy 90% isopropyl alcohol off the shelf. It's only $1.98 a bottle or something like that. It's cheap, easy to get and it does the job as well as you need as long as you are careful with it.

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Ron Yost
Master Film Handler

Posts: 344
From: Paso Robles, CA
Registered: Aug 2003


 - posted 07-27-2004 02:42 PM      Profile for Ron Yost   Email Ron Yost   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Wow .. I've never heard of Everclear. Thanks, Randy. [Smile]

Ron Yost .. loves the smell of denatured alcohol and shellac. Possibly explains a few things. [Eek!]

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Steve Scott
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1300
From: Minneapolis, MN
Registered: Sep 2000


 - posted 07-27-2004 02:58 PM      Profile for Steve Scott   Email Steve Scott   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I'd love to tell my GM that we need a booth supply of Everclear, I'd have a lot more candidates for booth work with that on hand [Smile]

-500th post [Smile]

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Tony Bandiera Jr
Film God

Posts: 2956
From: Moreland Idaho
Registered: Apr 2004


 - posted 07-27-2004 03:01 PM      Profile for Tony Bandiera Jr   Email Tony Bandiera Jr   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Graeme:

Use caution with alcohol of any type! At the Air Force theatre I started at, we used denatured alcohol to clean the machines. We had to stop when the AAFES engineer tried to remove a sprocket casting from our XL's. Seems that ALL types of alcohol attract water and the sprocket assembly was rusted to the main casting!

I should clarify that the practice was to place a rag in the soundhead to protect the optics and lateral guide roller, then spray the projector head from the top down! [uhoh] Made the heads clean enough to eat out of, but I'd always thought it to not be the best way. Turns out it was a practice started at our sister base in Arizona. And stopped by us!

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John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 07-27-2004 03:04 PM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote: Ron Yost
Anhydrous alcohol is -not- common antiseptic 'rubbing' (isoprophyl) alcohol. It is denatured ethyl alcohol (ethanol), derived from wood.
"Wood Alcohol" is methanol, and will harm some plastics, paints, and other materials. Ethyl alcohol is grain alcohol, the same kind found in liquor. [beer] It can be "denatured" to make it unfit to drink or even poisonous.

http://www.bartleby.com/65/me/methanol2.html

quote: John Pytlak
methyl alcohol, or wood alcohol, CH3OH, a colorless, flammable liquid that is miscible with water in all proportions. Methanol is a monohydric alcohol. It melts at -97.8°C and boils at 67°C. It reacts with certain acids to form methyl esters. Methanol is a fatal poison. Small internal doses, continued inhalation of the vapor, or prolonged exposure of the skin to the liquid may cause blindness. As a result, commercial use of methanol has sometimes been prohibited. Methanol is used as a solvent for varnishes and lacquers, as an antifreeze, and as a gasoline extender in the production of gasohol.
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthguidelines/isopropylalcohol/recognition.html

quote: John Pytlak
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH GUIDELINE FOR ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL


http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/i8840.htm

quote: John Pytlak
ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL (90 - 100%)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. Product Identification
Synonyms: 2-Propanol; sec-propyl alcohol; isopropanol; sec-propanol; dimethylcarbinol
CAS No.: 67-63-0
Molecular Weight: 60.10
Chemical Formula: (CH3)2 CHOH

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/hse/solvent.jhtml?id=0.1.4.5.16.4&lc=en

quote: John Pytlak
One of the most frequently asked questions we receive about film cleaning is: "What film cleaning solution do you recommend that we use?" Unfortunately, there is no simple answer to this question. After extensively searching for a "replacement" for 1,1,1-Trichloroethane, no one chemical has been identified as having all the positive performance attributes of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane. The table below provides a list of alternative solvents suitable for cleaning motion picture films (ECN, ECI, ECP). Each solvent has been tested for color image dye stability and physical deformation of the film (e.g., base curling). In the table you will note that there are many differences between the solvents: boiling points, cost, cleaning ability, etc. The choice of a solvent will be dependent upon its particular application and additionally may be subject to rules and regulations regarding health, safety, and environmental considerations. We strongly suggest that you fully research and carefully test any film cleaning solution to determine if it will fulfill all your specific operational and end-product quality criteria before making a final selection.

The successful and safe use of these solutions in existing (or future) film cleaning equipment has been left to the equipment manufacturers since they must optimize their equipment for the individual properties of the various solutions (e.g., machine speed, drying temperature, part compatibility, cleaning setup, safety features, etc.).




[ 07-27-2004, 04:10 PM: Message edited by: John Pytlak ]

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Dan Lyons
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 698
From: Seal Beach, CA
Registered: Sep 2002


 - posted 07-27-2004 04:20 PM      Profile for Dan Lyons   Email Dan Lyons   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
I should clarify that the practice was to place a rag in the soundhead to protect the optics and lateral guide roller, then spray the projector head from the top down!
Geez.. spraying down machinery on a routine basis with alchohol... what idiot came up with that?

danny

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Don E. Nelson
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 138
From: Brentwood, CA, USA
Registered: Nov 2001


 - posted 07-27-2004 05:24 PM      Profile for Don E. Nelson   Email Don E. Nelson   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
andydrous means: with out water, remember that from chemistry class Brad? The water is removed by heating and/or vacuum to produce anhydrous alcohol.
For optics, you really don't want any water in your final cleaning swipe. Alcohol will evaporate cleanly.

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Tony Bandiera Jr
Film God

Posts: 2956
From: Moreland Idaho
Registered: Apr 2004


 - posted 07-28-2004 01:58 AM      Profile for Tony Bandiera Jr   Email Tony Bandiera Jr   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Dan:

Would have loved to find out. This same idiot suggested the alcohol as a solution to sticky start contacts on the motor! [Eek!] Let the fun begin!
I wish I still had a copy of the booth proceedures from that room. Lots of strange ideas. None of which were approved by AAFES anyway.

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Steve Guttag
We forgot the crackers Gromit!!!

Posts: 12207
From: Annapolis, MD
Registered: Dec 1999


 - posted 07-28-2004 09:21 AM      Profile for Steve Guttag   Email Steve Guttag   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Isopropyl Alcohol is available as Anhydrous (little or no water...there is normally a 99.X % pure version available). This is NOT the same thing as Rubbing Alcohol which is typically 10% water by volume.

Tape head cleaner was pretty much forced to Anhydrous Isopropyl when 1,1,1 Triclor... was banned by the wackos.

Steve

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Randy Stankey
Film God

Posts: 6425
From: Erie, Pennsylvania
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 07-28-2004 10:30 AM      Profile for Randy Stankey   Email Randy Stankey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
For Ron: Everclear

I really don't recommend keeping this in your booth. It's some nasty freakin' stuff! If one of your employees gets hold of it and thinks it's cool to drink he/she could end up in the hospital or even 6 feet under!

If you drank two shots of Everclear it would be the equivalent of drinking a HALF CASE of beer. The difference is that you can't drink 12 beers in 30 seconds. (Unless you are Phill Hill [Big Grin] ) Your blood alcohol level would skyrocket in a matter of minutes and you'd probably be in an alcohol-induced stupor (or unconscious) within the hour!

Everclear is sold mainly for making other drinks from. For instance, you might mix an ounce or two of Everclear into a full pitcher of fruit juice, lemonade or Kool-Aid to make the equivalent of "Hard Lemonade", etc. You can also make other liqueurs and cordials.

When I was in college, it was popular to get a bowl of fruit and dowse it with Everclear and let it soak in for a few hours. Some people also cut open a watermelon and poured in some Everclear. Then you leisurely ate the fruit and caught a buzz from it.

Stories abound in these parts which tell of kids getting their hands on the stuff then drinking it straight or with little dilution. Blindness, hospitalization and death are the common threads in the stories.

If you think you need pure (or nearly pure) alcohol for some purpose, then OK, but seriously think twice before keeping that junk in your booth. Unless you have some special purpose in mind, I don't see why other cleaners that you can buy wouldn't do just as good a job.

Steve's mention of "Tape Head Cleaner" being anhydrous alcohol might be an avenue for you to persue but, if you need any quantity of it, you're probably going to spend a lot of money.

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Thomas Procyk
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1842
From: Royal Palm Beach, FL, USA
Registered: Feb 2002


 - posted 07-28-2004 11:26 AM      Profile for Thomas Procyk   Email Thomas Procyk   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Florida is one of those "wierd" states where you can't get 190 proof Everclear. Only the weaker 153 proof. If we ever need the real stuff, we have to drive up to Georgia. [Smile]

=TMP=

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