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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Film Handlers' Forum   » Christie Filmgate Adjustment (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Christie Filmgate Adjustment
Nicholas Simmons
Film Handler

Posts: 6
From: Walnut Creek, CA
Registered: Jun 2004


 - posted 07-24-2004 12:23 PM      Profile for Nicholas Simmons   Author's Homepage   Email Nicholas Simmons       Edit/Delete Post 
What is the correct way to adjust the lateral guide rollers on a christie filmgate? I have "the tool" but I have found it very difficult to get them set so both the top and bottom rollers will turn with the film running. When I get one right though, the image looks very good.

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Mark Gulbrandsen
Film God

Posts: 15868
From: Bountiful, Utah
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 07-24-2004 06:52 PM      Profile for Mark Gulbrandsen   Email Mark Gulbrandsen   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I use a digital height gauge resting with the trap on a granite tool plate. the gauge is a good place to start though and then tweek with the height gauge so they are both exactly the same height. I've also found that if either band is slightly cocked that it can also cause the filkm not to contact one roller or the other.

Mark @ CLACO

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Richard Hamilton
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1341
From: Evansville, Indiana
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 07:00 PM      Profile for Richard Hamilton   Email Richard Hamilton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Mark,
Every Tech should carry a slab of Granite in their tool kit!! [Wink]

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Phil Hill
I love my cootie bug

Posts: 7595
From: Hollywood, CA USA
Registered: Mar 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 07:09 PM      Profile for Phil Hill   Email Phil Hill       Edit/Delete Post 
Richard... [thumbsup]

That's too funny! [beer]

>>> Phil

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Will Kutler
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1485
From: Tucson, AZ, USA
Registered: Feb 2001


 - posted 07-24-2004 07:20 PM      Profile for Will Kutler   Email Will Kutler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
What Mark is speaking of (granite) is a "must have/standard item" in any machine shop.

Ya, those Christie traps can be a pain to adjust. I also used the Lock-Tight that Christie recommended, but it still managed to loosen up over time.

Personally, I cannot stand Lock-Tight. I prefer using correct locking type hardware. Companies like Berg have set screws with
self-locking inserts.

Do be careful of Christie gates where the threads for all four set-screws can be a loose-tolorance fit, resulting in in a problem with those set-screws wanting to loosen up and drop the jewels on the floor!

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Phil Hill
I love my cootie bug

Posts: 7595
From: Hollywood, CA USA
Registered: Mar 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 07:22 PM      Profile for Phil Hill   Email Phil Hill       Edit/Delete Post 
Ya know Will... I HATE when **my** jewels fall on the floor...

>>> Phil

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Richard Hamilton
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1341
From: Evansville, Indiana
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 07:39 PM      Profile for Richard Hamilton   Email Richard Hamilton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Will, how many techs have access to a machine shop? In all of my experience servicing theaters, I've only been to one shop, and that was to make a new part. I don't recall any granite there either!

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Richard Fowler
Film God

Posts: 2381
From: Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA
Registered: Jun 2001


 - posted 07-24-2004 08:17 PM      Profile for Richard Fowler   Email Richard Fowler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Granite stones need not be big...I use a 6 x 8 inch granite to check small parts.

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Richard Hamilton
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1341
From: Evansville, Indiana
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 08:36 PM      Profile for Richard Hamilton   Email Richard Hamilton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
6x8x? And how heavy? Still not something I would carry with my tools.

Rick

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Ron Yost
Master Film Handler

Posts: 344
From: Paso Robles, CA
Registered: Aug 2003


 - posted 07-24-2004 08:59 PM      Profile for Ron Yost   Email Ron Yost   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
1/4" plate glass is very 'flat', too. [Smile]

Ron Yost

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Richard Fowler
Film God

Posts: 2381
From: Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA
Registered: Jun 2001


 - posted 07-24-2004 09:01 PM      Profile for Richard Fowler   Email Richard Fowler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Weighs about 10 - 12 pounds. Something that I don't carry too often. Have used it in my cinematography work in addition for mechanical issues in cinema equipment. The old Mega Systems had a fab machine shop....too bad it is no more.

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Richard Hamilton
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1341
From: Evansville, Indiana
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 09:09 PM      Profile for Richard Hamilton   Email Richard Hamilton   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Now,for me the Megasystems shop and building is just a memory. All good, and I will vacation in St. Augustine often!

Rick

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Will Kutler
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1485
From: Tucson, AZ, USA
Registered: Feb 2001


 - posted 07-24-2004 09:17 PM      Profile for Will Kutler   Email Will Kutler   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Granite or cast iron surface plates are norms in shops and are used as reference surfaces for precision inspection. They come in a variety of sizes, from 6 X 8 through huge tables.

No, this would not be a tool-box item.

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John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 07-24-2004 09:24 PM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Precision alignment:

http://catalog.starrett.com/catalog/catalog/PLH2.asp?NodeNum=25399

http://www.newport.com/Support/Tutorials/Vibration_Control/v2.asp

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Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17587
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 07-24-2004 10:57 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
Nicholas,

The tool from Christie works amazingly good for as simple as it is. Here is what you do.

Place the tool up against the edge of the trap. Make sure there is a tiny bit of clearance between the outboard flange of the lateral guide roller and the tool.

***Be careful not to lose the jewels!!! When you are wanting to move the lateral guide roller toward the inboard side, loosen the inboard allen screw only about 2 rotations, then turn the outboard allen screw inward until it starts to snug up, then go back and loosen the inboard allen screw about 2 rotations and repeat. (Obviously you do this in reverse if you need to move the lateral guide roller toward the outboard side.) Also, make SURE you do this over something to catch those jewels in! A lid to a banker's box works amazingly well, as would a reasonably sized Tupperware tub. Just something where the jewel cannot drop and roll 1000 miles away and hide itself in the event you accidentally loosen one of the screws too far and let it fall out.

Getting back to where I left off, loosen the inboard allen screw 2 turns so that you can move the outboard allen screw inward until the lateral guide's outboard edge starts pressing up against the alignment tool. What you want to do is turn the allen screw until you see it pressing the alignment tool to where it is starting to cock it at an angle, so it is no longer 100% flush. Then back off just a tiny bit until you see the tool come back to rest flat and square up against the film trap. (You have to be holding the alignment tool with pressure into the side of the trap so that your pressure acts like a spring against the guide roller that is pressing into it. Yes, this is very hard to put into words without pictures.) Now immediately tighten the outboard allen screw's locking screw.

Next you want to tighten the inboard allen screw until the lateral guide roller can no longer spin. Find that magic spot to where it just BARELY starts to cease spinning when gently spinning the outboard edge by hand. Then back off 1/8 of a turn exactly and lock down the inboard allen screw's locking screw. At this point the lateral guide roller is not only aligned via the tool, but there should be zero lateral movement of the outboard flange. If there is side to side movement, it will translate to the screen...hence the 1/8 of a turn trick.

Repeat for the other lateral guide roller.

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