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» Film-Tech Forum   » Operations   » Film Handlers' Forum   » Interlock setup (Page 1)

 
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Author Topic: Interlock setup
George Roher
Master Film Handler

Posts: 266
From: Washington DC
Registered: Jul 99


 - posted 02-11-2001 06:14 PM      Profile for George Roher   Email George Roher   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
One of the theatres I work in has a rather odd system for interlock in one of it's booths. Instead of attaching a series of rollers to the wall and/or ceiling, they purchased a bunch of portable poles that have rollers on them. So when an interlock is setup in this booth, the operator has to grab a few poles and place them between the machines being interlocked. It can be a pain trying to align everything properly (especially when one is pressed for time). I much prefer having rollers permanently setup between the machines. Threading an interlock is simpler that way. Does anyone else use these poles for interlock?



John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 02-11-2001 06:20 PM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I don't favor the practice of interlocking, except as a last resort, but the rollers on poles idea seems very prone to misalignment. Do the poles have heavily weighted bottoms, so they don't move or tip over?

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Eastman Kodak Company
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7419
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Cell: 716-781-4036 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com
Web site: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion

Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17696
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 02-11-2001 06:23 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
Awwwwww, come on John. Interlocking is fun and "done right" will not damage the film in any way whatsoever.

Those poles are typically weighted down at the base and commonly have a tire wrapped around them for tipping slightly and rolling into position. Rarely do I ever see them lined up properly.

John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 02-11-2001 06:42 PM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"Done Right" is the big question mark in most cases. Wouldn't you really like each screen to have its own print anyway???

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Eastman Kodak Company
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7419
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Cell: 716-781-4036 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com
Web site: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion

Joe Redifer
You need a beating today

Posts: 12859
From: Denver, Colorado
Registered: May 99


 - posted 02-11-2001 08:32 PM      Profile for Joe Redifer   Author's Homepage   Email Joe Redifer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
What would the purpose of that be? Interlocking a single print over at least 16 screens will keep the morons out of the booth!

Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17696
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 02-11-2001 09:39 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
Actually no, I'd rather just have the one print. It's much more impressive to show someone a print that has been ran double or three times the amount of the other theaters in town...and for it to still look perfect.

John Eickhof
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 588
From: Wendell, ID USA
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 02-11-2001 11:18 PM      Profile for John Eickhof   Author's Homepage   Email John Eickhof   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Come on Brad, you know that in the normal
'booth' environment of today, the result of no snafus when interlocking would be rare!
I agree with John P, that multi print screenings are more productive especially as far as the film companies are concerned, and the 'have it when you want it' attitude of the theatre going public! I must commend you on the rather interesting interlock you guys pulled off! However, I want to know two things...First, how long was your thread-up leader and how long did it take to fully lace the system? And second, how long was the feature you ran, and obviously, all projectors were equipped with sych motors on the same phase?

------------------
John Eickhof President, Chief Slave
Northwest Theatre Equipment Co., Inc.
P.O.Box 258
Wendell, ID. 83355-0258
208-536-5489
email: jeickhof@nteequip.com

Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17696
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 02-12-2001 12:33 AM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
Threading leader was a little over 2200 feet if memory serves. It took 45 mintues to thread all 16 machines. Normally though, I can string up an interlock through 2, 3, or 4 projectors quicker than I can thread each one individually. The secret is being able to "thread up" and doing the entire thing in reverse. The movie was somewhere around 1 hour 45 minutes long, give or take 10 minutes.

I won't disagree with the notion of having multiple start times, though.


Gordon McLeod
Film God

Posts: 9473
From: Toronto Ontario Canada
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 02-12-2001 08:31 AM      Profile for Gordon McLeod   Email Gordon McLeod   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Actually running reel to reel and circuiting the reels is the best as it prevents snackbar congestion with multiple start time and still a single print

Greg Mueller
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1687
From: Port Gamble, WA
Registered: Jun 99


 - posted 02-12-2001 08:59 AM      Profile for Greg Mueller   Author's Homepage   Email Greg Mueller   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Why not have one reel at each of 6 or 7 screens, and have the patrons run from one screen to the next as the reels run out. That could be fun. The ultimate in crowd control/processing. The last move could be out the back door.

------------------
Greg Mueller
Amateur Astronomer, Machinist, Filmnut

Dave Bird
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 756
From: Perth, Ontario, Canada
Registered: Jun 2000


 - posted 02-12-2001 09:07 AM      Profile for Dave Bird   Author's Homepage   Email Dave Bird   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yes, Greg! But each reel in a progressively smaller auditorium, like musical chairs for grownups!

Bill Purdy
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 139
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: Oct 1999


 - posted 02-12-2001 10:15 AM      Profile for Bill Purdy   Author's Homepage   Email Bill Purdy   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I agree with Brad's "Awwwwww, come on John. Interlocking is fun and "done right" will not damage the film in any way whatsoever."

I smile every time I remember a set-up in the old "Crest" theatre in north Seattle. Let's say that we are starting in house #1. From an old Potts platter (the ones that used Chrysler auto distributor points), through the first AA II, across the ceiling, through a hole in the wall, across the manager's office, a left turn and down a hall way, a right turn, through another hole in a wall, across a small booth, through the second AA II to take-up on a Drive-In platter. The two automations were totally different and special interface boxes had to be made. The building was undergoing alterations with all the attendant dust so we put a pair of opposed anti-static brushes in the middle of the run which really worked well. There was enough film in the air that it took 51 seconds from screen to screen which means a length of about 96 feet because this was in 70mm! Yup, it is fun!

------------------
Bill Purdy
Component Engineering

John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 02-12-2001 11:31 AM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Bill

Again, "Done Right" is the big question mark. One badly aligned guide roller, or poor tensioning that drags the film across the floor, will forever leave its mark on the print. At least KODAK VISION Color Print film will not attract dirt on all that free-hanging film (2200 feet for the 16 screen world record, 96 feet for yours) with a static charge, because of it's transparent conductive backing layer. Older film was a shocking "dust magnet".

I can understand the need to interlock when a picture like "Hannibal" is selling out, and you haven't sold any tickets for the "dog" playing next door. But the scheduling flexibility and lower risk of having multiple prints for a hit movie is hard to argue with.

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Eastman Kodak Company
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7419
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Cell: 716-781-4036 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com
Web site: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion

Brad Miller
Administrator

Posts: 17696
From: Plano, TX (36.2 miles NW of Rockwall)
Registered: May 99


 - posted 02-12-2001 12:10 PM      Profile for Brad Miller   Author's Homepage   Email Brad Miller       Edit/Delete Post 
I've never had a problem with airborne dirt. The trick is to use a film cleaner, but when interlocking many people feel they have "enough to mess with" and will not run a cleaner. Most booths have major problems with grand openings from all of the construction dirt, but using cleaning machines will prevent that (which I have proved time and time again). Incidently, I only ran that 16 screen interlock through one cleaner, being the first one on #8, because I am strongly against placing film cleaners "between" projectors due to the slightly increased tension. When it got to the final projector, we watched the green bands and the film was absolutely immaculate. So my real point is that stretching film across the booth really is NOT an issue. I have done many overly lengthy interlocks in the past (most on new openings with ridiculous construction dirt) and have never had any dirt accumulation whatsoever. If airborne dust is bad enough to be a threat to the film, then I feel sorry for the projectionist who will have to breathe that air!

John Pytlak
Film God

Posts: 9987
From: Rochester, NY 14650-1922
Registered: Jan 2000


 - posted 02-12-2001 12:31 PM      Profile for John Pytlak   Author's Homepage   Email John Pytlak   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The problem of static attraction of dirt with older films was not the airborne dirt, but dirt attracted to the print when is got close to a dirty surface like the floor or an unkempt rewind bench. You could literally watch dust and dirt "jump up" to the highly charged film. Fortunately, the new conductive VISION print stocks quickly dissipate any dirt-attracting static buildup.

I totally agree that in addition to keeping the booth clean, on-line film cleaning is the best way to keep prints looking good, and avoid winding in abrasive particles that eventually will cause cinch marks. An on-line film cleaner for each projector is a good investment in "doing film right".

------------------
John P. Pytlak, Senior Technical Specialist
Worldwide Technical Services, Entertainment Imaging
Eastman Kodak Company
Research Labs, Building 69, Room 7419
Rochester, New York, 14650-1922 USA
Tel: 716-477-5325 Cell: 716-781-4036 Fax: 716-722-7243
E-Mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com
Web site: http://www.kodak.com/go/motion



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